• February 27, 2015 | 7:00pm

    Emerge Lit Lounge

    Emerge Lit Lounge

    at Soleri Plaza

    Emerge Lit Lounge

    An Emerge event, co-hosted with the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art. Join us for an evening of highly-charged “live science fiction” performances that fuse storytelling and live music.

    More details coming soon – also keep an eye on http://emerge.asu.edu for updates!

  • February 26, 2015

    Emerge at Canal Convergence

    Emerge at Canal Convergence

    at Soleri Plaza

    Emerge at Canal Convergence

    Check out an interactive installation presented by Emerge, created by artist Toby Atticus Fraley! Hint: robots are involved.

    More details coming soon – also keep an eye on http://emerge.asu.edu for updates!

    Learn more about Canal Convergence…

  • March 6, 2015

    Emerge 2015: The Future of Choices and Values

    Emerge 2015: The Future of Choices and Values

    at SkySong, the ASU Scottsdale Innovation Center

    Emerge 2015: The Future of Choices and Values

    More details coming soon – to learn more, visit http://emerge.asu.edu

  • February 21, 2015 | 11:45am

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: Warner Bros. in Space

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: Warner Bros. in Space

    at Chandler Downtown Community Center

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: Warner Bros. in Space

    This Science Fiction TV Dinner (at lunchtime) is part of the Chandler Science Spectacular, a festival for all ages celebrating and exploring invention. We’ll screen a series of classic Warner Bros. animated shorts featuring the space adventures of beloved characters like Marvin the Martian and Daffy Duck, then have a conversation with ASU professors Kevin Sandler, an expert on the history of animation and editor of the book Reading the Rabbit: Explorations in Warner Bros. Animation, and David A. Williams, director of ASU’s Ronald Greeley Center for Planetary Studies and a collaborator on a number of NASA missions, including the Magellan Mission to Venus and Galileo Mission to Jupiter.

    Free and open to the public!

    Marvin the Martian image by Christopher Sessums, used under the terms of a Creative Commons license.

  • January 22, 2015

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: Dollhouse

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: Dollhouse

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: Dollhouse

     

    Stay tuned: more details coming soon!

    Co-hosted with ASU’s Project Humanities

    Featuring actor Harry Lennix, one of the stars of Dollhouse as well as the television series ER and the films The Matrix Reloaded, The Matrix Revolutions, and State of Play.

  • October 24, 2014 | 7:00pm

    Kim Stanley Robinson: The Chauvet Cave Paintings and the Human Mind

    Kim Stanley Robinson: The Chauvet Cave Paintings and the Human Mind

    at Changing Hands Phoenix

    Kim Stanley Robinson: The Chauvet Cave Paintings and the Human Mind

    Science fiction is always asking what humanity can become, but we can’t answer that question without understanding how we became who we are. Paleolithic humans were genetically identical to what we are today. They lived without writing and with technology that was sophisticated, but made entirely of natural materials. This technology hasn’t survived, except for fragments like stone tips. So what were these humans like?

    In recent years archaeologists have given us better answers to this question than ever before. The discovery of Ötzi the Iceman was a major find, along with the painted Chauvet Cave, twice as old as caves like Lascaux, with paintings just as beautiful and technically advanced. Kim Stanley Robinson, bestselling science fiction author of books including The Mars Trilogy, 2312, and Shaman, will describe these findings and explore what they imply for how we should live our lives today.

    The talk will be followed by a book signing. Learn more and order copies of Robinson’s books at the Changing Hands Bookstore website!

    ABOUT THE AUTHOR

    Kim Stanley Robinson is a New York Times bestseller and winner of the Hugo, Nebula, and Locus awards. He is the author of more than twenty books, including the bestselling Mars trilogy and the critically acclaimed Forty Signs of Rain, The Years of Rice and Salt and 2312. In 2008, he was named a “Hero of the Environment” by Time magazine, and he works with the Sierra Nevada Research Institute.

     

    Co-hosted by the Center for Science and the Imagination and Changing Hands Bookstore

  • September 8, 2014 | 2:00pm

    Coffee @ Beyond: The Arrow of Time

    Coffee @ Beyond: The Arrow of Time

    at Goldwater Center, Room 505, Tempe

    Coffee @ Beyond: The Arrow of Time

    Trandisciplinary explorations at the edge of knowledge…

    Join Paul Davies, Regents’ Professor and Director of the Beyond Center at Arizona State University, at the first installment of the new monthly “Coffee @ Beyond” series! This month’s topic is “The Arrow of Time.”

    Abstract
    In daily life it is obvious that physical states of the universe evolve in time with a distinct directionality. The ultimate origin of this asymmetry in time, which is most famously captured by the second law of thermodynamics, has been a longstanding enigma, but seems to lie with cosmology and the state of the universe at its origin. I shall argue that gravitation holds the key to providing a comprehensive explanation. Still unresolved, however, is whether complexity in general, and biological evolution in particular, possess an intrinsic directionality.

  • September 13, 2014 | 3:00pm

    Project Hieroglyph: Book Launch – in Toronto

    Project Hieroglyph: Book Launch – in Toronto

    at Bakka Phoenix Books

    Project Hieroglyph: Book Launch – in Toronto

    Our global imagination about the future is dominated by gloomy dystopias and apocalyptic endgame scenarios. Can science fiction help us create visions of the future that are inspiring and optimistic, but still grounded in scientific, technological and social realities?

    Project Hieroglyph, inspired by Neal Stephenson and headquartered at Arizona State University’s Center for Science and the Imagination, aims to rekindle our grand ambitions for the future by bringing together top science fiction authors with scientists, engineers and other experts to collaborate on ambitious techno-optimistic visions of the near future. The project’s first anthology, Hieroglyph: Stories and Visions for a Better Future (William Morrow/HarperCollins), will be published on September 9, 2014.

    Join science fiction visionaries and Hieroglyph contributors Madeline Ashby and Karl Schroeder for a conversation about how science fiction can help prototype bold solutions to our most daunting challenges and help us think constructively and creatively about technology, culture and society.

    Books will be available to purchase at the event, and the conversation will be followed by a book signing.

    Need help finding Bakka Phoenix Books? Visit this page for a map.

  • October 8, 2014 | 5:00pm

    Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Oct 8 2014

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: Buffy the Vampire Slayer

    at ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: Buffy the Vampire Slayer

    What does it mean to be human? What are the boundary conditions? And when do those boundaries need to be patrolled with a sharpened stake?

    The expansion of wearable technology, augmented reality, and mobile devices that connect us (and track us) constantly and globally means that the boundaries between humans and our technology are blurred more than ever. Speculative fiction like Buffy the Vampire Slayer, which frequently explores the boundary between human and non-human, provides an interesting vantage point for considering our relationship with technology and how it shapes our identities.

    Join technologists and Buffy aficionados Bridget Kromhout and Astrid Atkinson and Dawn Gilpin, a theorist of media and identity and a fellow Buffy devotee, for a conversation about identity, technology, and how fantasy and storytelling can help us understand who we are and where we’re going.

    The event will feature a free dinner, a screening of the season 5 episode “Intervention,” featuring the “Buffybot,” a robotic replica of the series’ protagonist, and a conversation and Q+A.

    PANELISTS

    Bridget Kromhout is a tech operations engineer at DramaFever who moonlights as a amateur writer and editor. She likes finicky wide-column data stores, stats-driven monitoring, formal grammars, bicycle-powered camping, and butchering pumpkins for home canning. In her spare time she organizes and speaks at conferences (mostly in tech but occasionally in fandom). She’s been present in Buffyverse fandom (and occasionally active) since 2003.

    Astrid Atkinson is a senior engineering manager at Google, where she builds massively distributed infrastructure for the Cloud. She’s active in women in leadership and women in engineering forums, and in her spare time she likes to drive terrible race cars, watch TV, and talk about it.

    Dawn Gilpin is an associate professor of public relations and social media at ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Her research explores crisis, issues, community, and identity. She cut her teeth on media analysis in Buffy fandom, which is also where she also learned to negotiate those complex, volatile social systems she was studying. She named her cat after a Buffyverse character, enjoys motorcycles and theatre and travel, defies her accident-prone nature by dancing and running on mountain trails, and in her spare time is plotting world domination. (Luckily for the world, she doesn’t really have any spare time.)

     

    Need help finding the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication? Visit this page for photos and a map. 

  • October 22, 2014 | 7:00pm

    Project Hieroglyph and Changing Hands – in Phoenix, AZ

    Project Hieroglyph and Changing Hands – in Phoenix, AZ

    at Crescent Ballroom

    Project Hieroglyph and Changing Hands – in Phoenix, AZ

    **Tickets, which require a book purchase, required for admission. Visit the Changing Hands website for more information and to purchase tickets until 2 pm today. Tickets will be available at Crescent Ballroom starting at 5:30 pm.

    Project Hieroglyph science fiction authors, scientists, engineers, and other experts share their ambitious, optimistic visions of the near future.

    Presenters will include science fiction author and essayist Madeline Ashby (Machine Dynasty series), Aurora Award winner Karl Schroeder (Lockstep), Clarke Award finalist Kathleen Ann Goonan (Queen City Jazz), Zygote Games founder James L. Cambias (A Darkling Sea), acclaimed cosmologist and astrobiologist Paul Davies (The Eerie Silence), science fiction and fantasy anthologist Kathryn Cramer (Year’s Best SF), ASU Center for Science and the Imagination director Ed Finn, futurist Brenda Cooper (Creative Fire), and legendary Locus, Nebula, and Hugo award-winning author Kim Stanley Robinson (2312 and Red Mars).

    Project Hieroglyph, founded by New York Times bestseller Neal Stephenson, is a group of experts and authors that aim to rekindle humanity’s grand ambitions for the future through the power of storytelling. In his 2011 article “Innovation Starvation,” Stephenson argued that we — the society whose scientists and engineers witnessed the airplane, the automobile, nuclear energy, the computer, and space exploration — must reignite our ambitions to think boldly and Do Big Stuff. Join us for an evening uniting leading thinkers, writers and visionaries to offer alternatives to the gloomy dystopian images that pervade our culture. We’ll discuss topics ranging from architecture and engineering to education, sustainability and neuroscience and share stories and visions of better futures we could build today.

    EVENT DETAILS

    Tickets are required for admission.
    –$27.99 + tax for one seat and one copy of Hieroglyph.
    –$5 for one additional seat.
    –Limit of one $5 admission per $27.99 book purchase.
    –For more details about the event and to purchase the book and event tickets, visit the Changing Hands website.

    ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

    MADELINE ASHBY is a science fiction writer and strategic foresight consultant based in Toronto. She is the author of vN (2012) and iD(2013), the first two novels in her Machine Dynasty series. Her fiction has appeared in NatureFLURBTesseractsImaginarium, andEscape Pod. Her essays and criticism have appeared at Boing Boingio9WorldChangingCreators ProjectArcfinity, and Tor.com.

    KARL SCHROEDER divides his time between writing fiction and analyzing the future impact of science and technology on society. He is the author of nine novels and has pioneered a new mode of writing that blends fiction and rigorous futures research: Crisis in Zefra(2005) and Crisis in Urlia (2011) were commissioned by the Canadian army as research tools. Karl holds a master’s degree in strategic foresight and innovation from OCAD University in Toronto.

    KATHLEEN ANN GOONAN is a science fiction author, educator, and critic. Her debut novel, Queen City Jazz (1994), was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year, and her novel In War Times (2007) won the John W. Campbell Award for Best Science Fiction Novel. She is a visiting professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

    JAMES L. CAMBIAS is a science fiction author and game designer. His short stories have been featured in the Magazine of Fantasy and Science FictionNature, and the Journal of Pulse-Pounding Narratives. He is a cofounder of Zygote Games, codesigned Bone Wards: The Game of Ruthless Paleontology, and has written or contributed to books for a number of tabletop role-playing games.

    PAUL DAVIES is a theoretical physicist, cosmologist, astrobiologist, and best-selling author. He is a regents’ professor, director of the Beyond Center for Fundamental Concepts in Science, and co-director of the Cosmology Initiative at Arizona State University. His award-winning books include The Eerie Silence (2010), The Goldilocks Enigma (2007), How to Build a Time Machine (2007), and The Mind of God (1992).

    KATHRYN CRAMER is co-editor for Project Hieroglyph, and was co-editor of The Year’s Best Fantasy and The Year’s Best SF series with David G. Hartwell. She is on the editorial board of The New York Review of Science Fiction, which has been nominated for the Hugo Award many times, and won a World Fantasy Award for her anthology The Architecture of Fear (1987).

    ED FINN is co-editor for Project Hieroglyph and the founding director of the Center for Science and the Imagination at Arizona State University, where he is an assistant professor with a joint appointment in the School of Arts, Media and Engineering and the Department of English.

    KIM STANLEY ROBINSON is a New York Times bestseller and winner of the Hugo, Nebula, and Locus awards. He is the author of more than twenty books, including the bestselling Mars trilogy and the critically acclaimed Forty Signs of Rain, The Years of Rice and Salt and 2312. In 2008, he was named a “Hero of the Environment” by Time magazine, and he works with the Sierra Nevada Research Institute.

    BRENDA COOPER is a science fiction author, futurist, and technology professional. She is the chief information officer for the city of Kirkland, Washington, and a member of the Futurist Board for the Lifeboat Foundation. Brenda is the author of seven novels, including The Silver Ship and the Sea, which won the Endeavor Award in 2008.

  • September 10, 2014 | 7:30pm

    Techno-Optimism: Neal Stephenson and Friends – in Silicon Valley

    Techno-Optimism: Neal Stephenson and Friends – in Silicon Valley

    at Kepler's Books

    Techno-Optimism: Neal Stephenson and Friends – in Silicon Valley

    To buy tickets online, go to Brown Paper Tickets; to buy tickets in person, visit Kepler’s Books in Menlo Park!

    Is this the new Golden Age of science fiction? Good science fiction has the potential to act as a powerful social force as it did in the late 1930s and early 1940s. It has the power to inspire collaboration with professionals in science and engineering and opens up space for innovation and big ideas without the constriction of data and practicality. Join Neal Stephenson, best-selling science and speculative fiction writer and game designer, and five of today’s leading thinkers, writers, and visionaries for a discussion of the intersection of world-changing art and technology.

    Hieroglyph: Stories and Visions for a Better Future is an anthology of stories that push the limits of our recognizable reality while avoiding the classic science fiction formula, namely a dystopia or technology that has advanced far beyond any recognizable relationship to our world. Hieroglyph aims to inspire production of new technologies to help solve the problems just beyond our current landscape.

    Panelists Neal Stephenson, Annalee Newitz, Rudy Rucker, Keith Hjelmstad, Charlie Jane Anders, and editors Ed Finn and Kathryn Cramer will discuss Hieroglyph and exciting real-world applications of the science fiction genre.

     

  • September 30, 2014 | 6:00pm

    Project Hieroglyph: Book Launch and Celebration – in New York City

    Project Hieroglyph: Book Launch and Celebration – in New York City

    at Tumblr Headquarters, Manhattan

    Project Hieroglyph: Book Launch and Celebration – in New York City

    Free event – registration required! Use the Eventbrite widget to the right or visit Eventbrite to register. 

    Our global imagination about the future is dominated by gloomy dystopias and apocalyptic endgame scenarios. Can science fiction help us create visions of the future that are inspiring and optimistic, but still grounded in scientific, technological and social realities?

    Project Hieroglyph, inspired by Neal Stephenson and headquartered at Arizona State University’s Center for Science and the Imagination, aims to rekindle our grand ambitions for the future by bringing together top science fiction authors with scientists, engineers and other experts to collaborate on ambitious techno-optimistic visions of the near future. The project’s first anthology, Hieroglyph: Stories and Visions for a Better Future (HarperCollins), will be published on September 9, 2014.

    Join science fiction visionaries and Hieroglyph contributors Elizabeth Bear and Madeline Ashby and co-editor Ed Finn for a conversation about how science fiction can help prototype bold solutions to our most daunting challenges and help us think constructively and creatively about technology, culture and society.

    Books will be available to purchase at the event, and the conversation will be followed by a book signing. To pre-order Hieroglyph: Stories and Visions for a Better Future today, visit HarperCollins, Indiebound or Amazon.

    Note: Once you register for the event through Eventbrite, the address for Tumblr Headquarters will be listed on your PDF ticket, which will be emailed to you with your order confirmation.

  • October 26, 2014 | 7:30pm

    Doctorow and Stephenson: Reigniting Society’s Ambition with Science Fiction – in Seattle, WA

    Doctorow and Stephenson: Reigniting Society’s Ambition with Science Fiction – in Seattle, WA

    at Town Hall Seattle

    Doctorow and Stephenson: Reigniting Society’s Ambition with Science Fiction – in Seattle, WA

    Admission: $5.00; tickets and book pre-orders are available at the Town Hall Seattle website

    Author Neal Stephenson (Reamde, Snow Crash) laments our society’s loss of a key superpower — the ability to “Get Big Stuff Done.” He shoulders some of the blame, along with colleagues in the realms of science and speculative fiction, with what he calls a failure to supply “hieroglyphs”: “Asimovian robots, Heinleinian rocket ships, Gibsonian cyberspace… plausible, thought-out pictures of alternate realities in which… compelling innovation has taken place.” Project Hieroglyph brings together writers, artists, scientists, and new technologies in an effort to “reignite the iconic and optimistic visions” of the past, and the new anthology Hieroglyph: Stories and Visions for a Better Future features works from Stephenson, Cory Doctorow (Little Brother, Rapture of the Nerds) and others, to challenge people to think in terms of technology, creativity, and bold futures.

    Books will be available to purchase at the event, and the conversation will be followed by a book signing.

    Presented by: Town Hall and University Book Store, as part of the Arts & Culture series. Sponsored by City Arts
    Event times: 7:30 – 8:45 p.m.
    Doors open: 6:30 p.m.
    Learn more: About Doctorow / About Stephenson

  • September 30, 2014 | 6:00pm

    House MD, Sept 30, 2014

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: House, M.D.

    at Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: House, M.D.

    Our Science Fiction TV Dinner series is a launch pad for new conversations about science, technology, art and society. Enjoy dinner from local food trucks, then watch a screening of the House, M.D. episode “Cane and Able,” in which misanthropic genius diagnostician Gregory House and his team tackle the case of a young boy who believes he has been abducted and tortured by aliens. The story turns on a truth stranger than fiction: human chimeras who carry the DNA of more than one person in their bodies.

    Following the screening, Center for Science and the Imagination Editor and Program Manager Joey Eschrich will moderate a conversation featuring Dr. Cathy Seiler, scientific liaison at ASU’s Biodesign Institute, and Dr. Kenneth S. Ramos, associate vice president of precision health services and professor of medicine at the Arizona Health Sciences Center of the University of Arizona. The event is free – RSVP now!

    Food Truck Dinner: 6:00 p.m. (Food available for purchase)
    Event: 7:00 p.m.

  • August 14, 2014 | 11:00am

    Science and Storytelling – at the Arizona Innovation Summit

    Science and Storytelling – at the Arizona Innovation Summit

    at Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts

    Science and Storytelling – at the Arizona Innovation Summit

    Registration Required – $20 for the full-day Innovation Arizona Summit

    Join us at the Innovation Arizona Summit for a panel, “Science and Storytelling”: How do we share the excitement and wonder of scientific and technological exploration? Start with a good story. Panelists, including authors and filmmakers, will discuss the power of storytelling to inspire and educate the public.

    Panelists

    –Beth Davidow, Producer, OceanGems
    –Frank Kraljic, Producer and Director, The STEM Journals
    Conrad Storad, Science Writer, Editor, Author of Monster in the Rocks and other children’s books
    –Moderator: Joey Eschrich, Editor and Program Manager, Center for Science and the Imagination

    About the Innovation Arizona Summit

    As a joint collaborative of the Arizona SciTech Festival, the MIT Enterprise Forum Phoenix and the Arizona Commerce Authority, the Innovation Arizona Summit will explore the lifecycle of Innovation – from Inspiration to Commercialization. The summit will empower collaborators to expand their networks and engage in unique discussions around science, technology, entrepreneurship and innovation. What makes this summit so unique is the diversity of collaborators represented with business, industry, education, government, NGOs, community leaders and more. With an anticipated 20 sessions, 60 exhibitors, countless networking opportunities and 1,000 attendees, there is something for everyone. Registration is $20 for this all-day event, including our panel – sign up now!

     

    Image courtesy of Dennis Wilkinson, used under a Creative Commons license. Thanks Dennis!

  • November 5, 2014 | 7:00pm

    An Evening with Margaret Atwood: Imagination and Climate Futures

    An Evening with Margaret Atwood: Imagination and Climate Futures

    at Herberger Theatre for the Arts

    An Evening with Margaret Atwood: Imagination and Climate Futures

    Internationally renowned novelist and environmental activist Margaret Atwood will visit Arizona State University this November to discuss the relationship between art and science and the importance of creative writing and imagination for addressing social and environmental challenges. In this lecture Ms. Atwood will discuss her MaddAddam trilogy of novels that have become central to the emerging literary genre of climate fiction, or “CliFi.”

    Tickets will be available September 2, 2014. There will be a book signing following the lecture.

    This event is co-hosted by ASU’s Rob and Melani Walton Sustainability Solutions Initiatives, the Center for Science and the Imagination, and the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing.

     

    Photo by Jean Malek

  • September 15, 2014 | 7:30pm

    Project Hieroglyph: Can Science Fiction Revolutionize Science? – in Los Angeles

    Project Hieroglyph: Can Science Fiction Revolutionize Science? – in Los Angeles

    at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles

    Project Hieroglyph: Can Science Fiction Revolutionize Science? – in Los Angeles

    Presented by Zócalo Public Square and the Center for Science and the Imagination
    Moderated by Annalee Newitz, Editor-in-Chief, io9

    Registration Required: Make a Reservation Today!

    Isaac Asimov’s robots. Robert Heinlein’s rocket ships. William Gibson’s cyberspace. Before they vacuumed our houses, put a man on the moon, and changed the way we access information, these inventions were the stuff of science fiction. But today, in an era where it seems we have all the technology we could possibly need, science fiction has taken a dystopian turn. Artificial intelligence turns on its human creators. Genetic engineering causes civilizations to collapse. But what if we created and used science fiction to solve our most intractable problems? How can this genre of literature stoke the ambitions of scientists, engineers, and inventors? Science fiction writer Neal Stephenson and Arizona State University physicist Lawrence M. Krauss, both of whom contributed to the new anthology Hieroglyph: Stories and Visions for a Better Future, visit Zócalo to discuss whether science fiction can truly change contemporary science, and what the alternative futures we imagine mean for present-day innovation.

    Books will be available through Skylight Books. Parking is $9 at the Walt Disney Concert Hall garage. Enter from Second St., just west of Grand Ave.

    Thanks to our media sponsor, KCRW

  • June 7, 2014 | 8:00pm

    Nathan Fillion: Serenity, Softwire, and the Science of Science Fiction

    Nathan Fillion: Serenity, Softwire, and the Science of Science Fiction

    at ASU University Club
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    Nathan Fillion: Serenity, Softwire, and the Science of Science Fiction

    Join actor Nathan Fillion (FireflyCastle, Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog) and ASU professors Jim BellEd FinnPeter Goggin and Sara Imari Walker for an intimate conversation facilitated by science fiction author PJ Haarsma about science, science fiction, and the importance of reading in the lives of young people. Hors d’oeuvres and cash bar provided.

    Limited to a small group of 50 guests. Tickets are $250 per guest. To purchase tickets, visit asufoundation.org/serenity.

    Parking is available in the University Club lot at no charge on a first-come, first-served basis. Need help finding the University Club? Visit this page for photos and a map.

    Presented by the ASU College of Liberal Arts and Sciences’ Department of English and the Center for Science and the Imagination

  • June 6, 2014 | 6:00pm

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: Farscape

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: Farscape

    at Arizona Science Center
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    Science Fiction TV Dinner: Farscape

    Co-sponsored by the Arizona Science Center

    Free Event, Registration Required; Learn more and RSVP at the Arizona Science Center website 

    Living starships. Super-soldiers. Sentient plants. Intergalactic empires. Wormholes. Animatronic puppets. Join us for a Science Fiction TV Dinner with Farscape, a contemporary science fiction classic from Jim Henson Productions.

    We’ll be screening the episode “Throne for a Loss” from the series’ first season. Following the screening, Center for Science and the Imagination Director Ed Finn will moderate a conversation with Elizabeth Bear, a Hugo, Locus and John W. Campbell Award-winning science fiction and fantasy author, and Brad Allenby, President’s Professor of Sustainable Engineering and Lincoln Professor of Engineering and Ethics at ASU. The conversation will explore the scientific, technological, artistic and cultural dimensions of Farscape, and consider the relationship between science fiction and the cultures of science and technology. RSVP Now!

    This Science Fiction TV Dinner is part of the Arizona Science Center’s monthly Adults’ Night Out series, which provides free access to the Science Center and a number of activities from 5:30 – 9:00 pm. During online registration, guests can pre-order a box dinner for the Farscape screening for $6. Other snacks and beverages will be available for purchase on the night of the event.

    Need help finding the Arizona Science Center? Visit this page for information about location and parking.

    Farscape episode courtesy of the Jim Henson Company

  • May 13, 2014 | 4:00pm

    Conversation: The Future of Reading at Stanford University

    Conversation: The Future of Reading at Stanford University

    at Terrace Room, Margaret Jacks Hall, Stanford University
    0

    Conversation: The Future of Reading at Stanford University

    Free and open to the public

    How are digital platforms changing our engagement with books? How can we create digital texts that rival the material sophistication of the printed book? As the definition of reading changes in the network era, are we changing the definition of the self, the humanities, and knowledge itself? How will game mechanics, play, and performance shape the future of reading?

    On May 12-14 at Stanford University, renowned authors, musicians, journalists, artists and scholars will answer these questions and others as they collaboratively write and publish a book on The Future of Reading in just three days, as part of the Center for Science and the Imagination’s Sprint Beyond the Book project. The book sprint is an experiment in the future of the book as a collaborative, performative, and playful exercise. Join the authors for this public conversation to explore the Future of Reading.

    Speakers will include:

    -Ed Finn, director of the Center for Science and the Imagination at Arizona State University
    -David Rothenberg, experimental musician and professor of philosophy and music at the New Jersey Institute of Technology
    -Eileen Gunn, science fiction author and publisher of The Infinite Matrix
    -Mark Algee-Hewitt, associate director of the Literary Lab and research associate in the Department of English at Stanford University
    -Dan Gillmor, professor of practice at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University and a columnist for The Guardian and Mediactive

    To learn more about the project, visit http://SprintBeyondtheBook.com. Need help finding Margaret Jacks Hall? Visit this page for a map, or check out the Stanford University Campus Map.

  • June 6, 2014 | 3:00pm

    Project Hieroglyph at Phoenix ComiCon

    Project Hieroglyph at Phoenix ComiCon

    at Phoenix Convention Center, North 127C
    0

    Project Hieroglyph at Phoenix ComiCon

    How do we get people thinking more creatively and optimistically about the future? Start with a story. The Center for Science and the Imagination’s Project Hieroglyph teams up science fiction authors with scientists and engineers to rekindle our grand technological ambitions through the power of storytelling.

    Join the Center for Science and the Imagination at Phoenix ComiCon for a panel, Hieroglyph: Blueprints for a Better Future, featuring:

    -Elizabeth Bear, Hugo, Locus and John W. Campbell Award-winning science fiction author
    -Brad Allenby, President’s Professor of Sustainable Engineering, and Lincoln Professor of Engineering and Ethics at ASU
    -Ed Finn, Founding Director of the Center for Science and the Imagination and Assistant Professor of Arts, Media and Engineering / –English, ASU
    -Zach Berkson, PhD Student, Chemical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara

    To learn more about Phoenix ComiCon and buy tickets, visit http://www.phoenixcomicon.com

    Also be sure to check out two events organized by our friend and colleague Lev Horodyskyj, of ASU’s School of Earth and Space Exploration: the “Building Better Sci-Fi” panel and the “Scientist-Creator Mixer” on Friday, June 6.

  • May 10, 2014 | 1:00pm

    Unbelievable Biomed at AZ Science Center

    at Arizona Science Center
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    Unbelievable Biomed at AZ Science Center

    Join the Arizona Science Center on Saturday, May 10 for a day of exploration of biomedicine, bioengineering, nanotechnology and other scientific and technological forces that are shaping our future!

    Register Now

    Unbelievable Careers, 1-2 pm
    Kids and families table-hop to learn about amazing careers in biomedicine and bioengineering.

    Unbelievable Frontiers, 4-5:30 pm
    Arizona scientists discuss what students and the public need to know about cutting edge biomedical research. (IMAX Theater)

    Reception, 5:30 pm
    Enjoy appetizers, beverages and a cash bar. Sign up for a lab at 6 pm or watch a demonstration at 6:40 pm.

    Nano Latch-n-Catch Lab 6:00 – 6:45 pm

    Disease Detectives Lab, 6:00 – 6:45 pm

    Unbelievable Roadmap, 7-8:30 pm
    A panel of biomedical policy, education and research leaders discuss where Arizona needs to go next. (IMAX Theater)

    Seating is limited for each session. All events are FREE and walk-ins are welcome if seating is available. Walk-ins not welcome for labs. 

    **Registration deadline is 5/2/14 – Pre-registration is necessary for labs. 

     

  • May 2, 2014 | 6:00pm

    Art Show: Tom Sawyer Wears a Business Suit

    Art Show: Tom Sawyer Wears a Business Suit

    0

    Art Show: Tom Sawyer Wears a Business Suit

    6:00 pm – 10:00 pm
    Presented by ASU’s School of Art

    Join Bobby Zokaites of ASU’s School of Art for his MFA thesis exhibition, Tom Sawyers Wears a Business Suit. 

    Zokaites’s work investigates themes of adventure, childhood and play, while utilizing fabrication and assembly methods inspired by industrial processes. This combination of play and industry creates distinctive works of art that activate the surrounding industrial environment and encourage audience participation. In Tom Sawyer Wears a Business Suit, Zokaites has produced large-scale forms that simultaneously interrupt and compliment the Step Gallery’s industrial architecture. Unabashedly repurposing woven seatbelt webbing, Zokaites makes reference to pivotal industrial developments while presenting a circus-like environment that begs for playful exploration. If Tom Sawyer is to Henry Ford as a business suit is to a pair of stilts, then you can imagine the sort of opposites Zokaites is fusing together in this exhibition.

    During this opening reception, gallery visitors will have the opportunity to experience the work with a live sound complement by international trombone player Russ Zokaites (twin brother of the artist). Russ will perform work from his current musical initiative, The Ghetto Blaster Project which is a series of performances combining classical music with recycled noise – appropriately for this exhibition, car horns and street traffic – played through re-purposed boomboxes.

    Need help finding the Step Gallery? Visit this page for a map and directions. 

    About the Artist

    Bobby Zokaites is a visual artist working with large-scale kinetic sculpture and interactive architectural spaces. He earned his BFA in 2008 from Alfred University in western New York and moved to Arizona in 2011 to pursue his MFA at ASU’s Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts. He has exhibited his sculptural work widely, including a recent public commission for IN FLUX Cycle 4 in Gilbert, AZ, and has produced recent collaborative projects in Kansas City, MO, Glendale, AZ, and Urbana, IL. His work utilizes a variety of design, fabrication, and installation processes that incorporate 20th century industrial techniques and 21st century digital technologies. Blurring the line between fine art, public sculpture, and collaborative practice, his work engages diverse audiences and encourages active participation with the larger-than-life artwork. Learn more at http://bobbyzokaites.com

  • April 8, 2014 | 3:30pm

    Romancing the Rational: Debating the Scientific Imagination

    Romancing the Rational: Debating the Scientific Imagination

    at Language and Literature Building, Room 316
    0

    Romancing the Rational: Debating the Scientific Imagination

    Where do our ideas about the imagination come from? What role has imaginative exploration played in the history of science? And how have scientists guarded against the imagination’s radical creative chaos?

    Modern ideas about the imagination were powerfully shaped during the Romantic Era in 19th century Europe. Romantic poets, scientists and philosophers conceived of the imagination as a primary force behind the production of knowledge of all kinds. They fiercely debated about the nature of the imagination, how it worked, and why its prodigious creative potential might endanger the rationality and precision of the scientific method.

    Join ASU’s Center for Science and the Imagination and Department of English for a conversation with Richard C. Sha, professor in the Department of Literature at American University and an expert on science, literature and emotion in the Romantic Era. Richard will be joined by Mark Lussier, professor and chair of the Department of English, and Ed Finn, director of the Center for Science and the Imagination and assistant professor in the Department of English and School of Arts, Media and Engineering. Light refreshments will be served at the event.

    Co-sponsored with ASU’s Department of EnglishNeed help finding the Language and Literature (LL) building? Visit this page for photos and a map. 

    Image: William Blake, “The Ancient of Days” (1794)

  • March 6, 2014 | 6:00pm

    Improvisational Environments Open Studio

    Improvisational Environments Open Studio

    at iStage Blackbox Theatre, 2nd Floor, Matthews Center
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    Improvisational Environments Open Studio

    This week, ASU’s Synthesis Center and School of Arts, Media and Engineering are hosting researchers from Concordia University (Montreal), the University of California, Berkeley, the University of Southern California, and ASU in experimental sessions with movement and real-time media, exploring rhythm, temporal texture and transition in live events.

    Open studio-lab sessions will include students, faculty and researchers from movement arts, music, real-time media arts and sciences, electrical engineering, computer science and philosophy.

    Need help finding the Matthews Center? Visit this Google Maps page for a map to the building and quick access to street view.

  • March 6, 2014 | 3:00pm

    Digital Culture Studio – Emerge: Building a Carnival of the Future

    Digital Culture Studio – Emerge: Building a Carnival of the Future

    at Stauffer Hall B-Wing, Room 125
    0

    Digital Culture Studio – Emerge: Building a Carnival of the Future

    Join Emerge participants Bruce Sterling, David Rothberg and the ASU Center for Cognitive Ubiquitous Computing (CUbiC) for a preview of the fantastical and thought-provoking world of ASU’s Emerge at the ASU School of Arts, Media and Engineering’s Digital Culture Studio.

    After the Digital Culture Studio, attend Emerge’s Carnival of the Future on Friday, March 7 from 6:00 – 11:00pm. The Carnival features more than a dozen thrilling performances, interactive installations and immersive experiences. To learn more, visit http://emerge.asu.edu.

    Need help finding Stauffer B-Wing? Visit this page for photos and a map.

    About the Presenters

    Bruce Sterling is an author, journalist, editor, and critic. Best known for his ten science fiction novels, which helped define the cyberpunk subgenre of science fiction, he also writes short stories, book reviews, design criticism and introductions for books ranging from Ernst Juenger to Jules Verne. He is a contributing editor at Wired magazine and in 2013 he was the Visionary in Residence at the Center for Science and the Imagination at Arizona State University. Follow Bruce at http://brucesterling.tumblr.com/.

    David Rothenberg is an experimental musician whose work explores the relationship between humanity and nature. David has made music with birds, whales and cicadas, among other animals, and produced albums and books documenting these collaborations. He is also a composer and jazz clarinetist, and a Professor of Philosophy and Music at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. Learn more about David and his work at http://davidrothenberg.wordpress.com/.

    ASU’s Center for Cognitive Ubiquitous Computing (CUbiC) is an interdisciplinary research center focused on cutting edge research in human-centered multimedia computing focusing on assistive, rehabilitative and healthcare applications. CUbiC serves the needs of physically challenged individuals by empowering them with ubiquitous and pervasive computing technologies to enrich their lives. Learn more at https://cubic.asu.edu/.

  • March 5, 2014 | 6:30pm

    How to Build a Wonder Dome

    How to Build a Wonder Dome

    at Physical Education East, Room 139
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    How to Build a Wonder Dome

    Explore the intersection of cutting-edge technology, live performance and interactive storytelling with the Wonder Dome.

    Created by Center for Science and the Imagination research fellow Daniel Fine, the Wonder Dome is a state-of-the-art performance space that uses motion tracking, lighting and projection technology to create immersive environments and tell new kinds of stories about science, creativity and human connection. The Dome enables performers to engage the audience in ways that go far beyond the passive experience common in traditional theatre.

    Join us for a behind-the-scenes look at the technologies and theories that power the Wonder Dome! Space in the Wonder Dome is limited, so RSVP Now!

    Need help finding the Physical Education Building East? Visit this page for photos and a map.

    The Wonder Dome is a collaboration between ASU and The Ohio State University. To learn more, and for full production credits, visit http://wonderdome.co.

    This event is presented by ASU’s Emerge: The Carnival of the Future. Join us on March 7 for thrilling performances and immersive installations under a giant circus tent in Downtown Phoenix! Learn more at http://emerge.asu.edu.

  • March 6, 2014 | 11:30am

    Transhumanism, Filmmaking and the Future at the Center for Nanotechnology in Society

    Transhumanism, Filmmaking and the Future at the Center for Nanotechnology in Society

    at Interdisciplinary B-Wing, Room 366
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    Transhumanism, Filmmaking and the Future at the Center for Nanotechnology in Society

    RSVP Required: Click here to register now at the Center for Nanotechnology in Society

    Filmmaker Doug Wolens will discuss the making of his documentary The Singularity, which refers to a point in the future when we create computers with greater-than-human intelligence, bio-engineer our species and re-design matter through nanotechnology. How will these technologies change what it means to be human? In the film, Wolens speaks with leading futurists, computer scientists, artificial intelligence experts, and philosophers who turn over the question like a transhuman Rubik’s Cube. Ultimately, if we become more machine-like, and machines more like us, will we sacrifice our humanity to gain something greater? Or will we engineer our own demise? Join Wolens as he contemplates these questions and shares his experience making a documentary about a time somewhat beyond human imagination’s current capability. To view a trailer of the film and read an interview with Doug Wolens, see the The Atlantic article “Pondering Our Cyborg Future in a Documentary About the Singularity.”

    Need help finding Interdisciplinary B-Wing, Room 366? Visit this page for photos and a map.

    About Doug Wolens

    Doug Wolens grew up in Chicago, earned two BA degrees and a law degree, and spent seven years as a practicing attorney in New York City; he moved to San Francisco and became a filmmaker in 1993. Wolens’s first short, Happy Loving Couples, was selected to screen at the Sundance Film Festival. He made two other shorts, Reversal (1994) and In Frame (1995); both have played at film festivals around the world. His 1996 feature documentary Weed premiered at the International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam. In 2000, his feature documentary Butterfly was broadcast nationally on P.O.V., PBS’s documentary showcase and on The Sundance Channel. He is currently developing a documentary on aesthetics and design.

  • March 4, 2014 | 6:30pm

    The Singularity: Film Screening and Conversation

    The Singularity: Film Screening and Conversation

    at Stauffer Hall
    Room 125
    1

    The Singularity: Film Screening and Conversation

    An Emerge: The Carnival of the Future event, co-sponsored by ASU’s Center for Nanotechnology in Society and the Transhumanism Initiative of the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict

    In the future, will we create computers that surpass our intelligence? Will we bio-engineer our species to hybridize humans and machines? Will nanotechnology mean that the building blocks of matter become playthings for human industry and creativity? How might these emerging technologies change what it means to be human? The Singularity explores these issues with leading futurists, computer scientists, artificial intelligence experts and philosophers who turn over the question like a transhuman Rubik’s Cube. If we become more machine-like and machines become more like us, will we sacrifice our humanity to gain something greater? Or will we engineer our own demise?

    Join director Doug Wolens at ASU for a screening of The Singularity and a discussion with Hava Tirosh-Samuelson, Director of ASU’s Transhumanism Initiative at the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict, and Director of the Center for Jewish Studies at ASU; Ben Hurlbut, Co-Director of ASU’s Transhumanist Imagination project and Assistant Professor in the School of Life Sciences; and Andrew Pilsch, Assistant Professor in ASU’s Faculty of Interdisciplinary Humanities and Communication, focusing on transhumanist rhetoric. The event will be hosted by Clark Miller, Chair of ASU’s PhD program in Human and Social Dimensions of Science and Technology.

    Light refreshments will be served at the event. Need help finding Stauffer Hall B-Wing? Visit this page for photos and a map.

    Doug will also be discussing transhumanism, filmmaking and the future at the Center for Nanotechnology in Society on Thursday, March 6 at 11:30am. Learn more and RSVP!

    About the director: Doug Wolens grew up in Chicago, earned two BA degrees and a law degree, and spent seven years as a practicing attorney in New York City. He moved to San Francisco and became a filmmaker in 1993. Wolens’ first short, Happy Loving Couples, was selected to screen at the Sundance Film Festival. He’s made two other shorts, Reversal (1994) and In Frame (1995). His 1996 feature documentary, Weed, premiered at the International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam and had a 40-city theatrical tour in the U.S. In 2000, his documentary Butterfly was broadcast nationally on POV, PBS’s award-winning documentary showcase, and on The Sundance Channel.

  • January 29, 2014 | 3:45pm

    The Art of Launching a Satellite

    The Art of Launching a Satellite

    at Payne Hall, Room 129
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    The Art of Launching a Satellite

    When it comes to exploring space, why should scientists and engineers have all the fun? How can we use creative and artistic experiments to better understand our place in the universe? What can the humanities and the arts contribute to our expanding knowledge about space and the cosmos?

    Juan José Diaz Infante is a photographer, curator, and the director of the Mexican Space Collective, a group of artists who are launching a nanosatellite into space and using it as a platform for artistic and aesthetic experiments stretching from our world out into the great beyond. At this event, Juan will give a presentation about the Mexican Space Collective, its nanosatellite Ulises-I, and how space exploration can provide hope and inspiration to the Mexican people amid the chaos caused by the drug wars. To learn more about the Mexican Space Collective and Ulises-I, visit their website.

    Following the presentation, Juan will discuss creative and artistic approaches to space with Ariel Anbar, a Professor in the School of Earth and Space Exploration and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and the Director of ASU’s NASA-funded Astrobiology Program. Dr. Anbar’s research focuses on the evolution of the Earth’s climate and environment, and how that knowledge informs our search for other habitable, Earth-like planets. The conversation will be moderated by Ed Finn, Director of the Center for Science and the Imagination. Light refreshments will be served.

    Directions: Need help finding Payne Hall West? Visit this page for photos and a map. Be sure to enter the building from the North side, and then enter to your right. The door to Payne Hall West will be marked.

  • March 7, 2014 | 6:00pm

    Emerge 2014: The Carnival of the Future

    Emerge 2014: The Carnival of the Future

    at Downtown Phoenix: 3rd Street between Roosevelt and Garfield
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    Emerge 2014: The Carnival of the Future

    Friday, March 7, 6:00 – 11:00pm

    Arizona State University’s Emerge 2014 will be a “Carnival of the Future” – a radically creative, playful and challenging approach to the future world we actually want to make. It will feature massively public, evening-long adventures under a big tent showcasing cutting-edge performance and swarming, flying technology along with incisive visions of the future that obliterate the traditional boundaries between engineering, arts, sciences and humanities. Learn more at emerge.asu.edu

    The theme for Emerge 2014 is “The Future of Me,” for we find ourselves at a challenging intersection:

    Individuals have never had so much power – from Edward Snowden challenging nation states, to Bill Gates personally deciding to eradicate polio. Medicine is personalized, learning platforms are personalized, and entrepreneurs run global businesses out of their smartphones.

    At the same time, individuals have become nothing more than tiny motes in networked systems that are so staggering in complexity as to be beyond understanding, much less control. The idea of individual human agency seems fanciful in a world of Big Data and ubiquitous surveillance.

    Emerge 2014 challenges engineers, artists, scientists, designers, story tellers, ethicists, humanists, makers and futurists to explore questions of individuality, autonomy and freedom, as well as control, automation and facelessness. RSVP Now!

     

  • January 17, 2014

    American POP! Comic Books to Science Fiction…and Beyond

    American POP! Comic Books to Science Fiction…and Beyond

    at Tempe Center for the Arts
    2

    American POP! Comic Books to Science Fiction…and Beyond

    On display from January 17 – June 4, 2014

    The American POP! exhibition explores the transformative effects that science fiction and popular culture have on our everyday lives and the technology that surrounds us. The Tempe Center for the Arts and Arizona State University have worked together to create an exhibit that will investigate the relationship between popular culture, scientific inquiry, technological innovation and cultural change.

    Displays will include objects and collections from local and national collectors as well as original art, high tech models and limited edition pieces from some of America’s favorite pop culture icons.

    Fans of the original Batman series and Chuck Jones’ iconic Marvin the Martian: we highly recommend that you stop in to see some truly amazing displays!

    Check out our digital video display for American POP! now at csi.asu.edu/tca-pop

  • January 10, 2014 | 6:30pm

    Making People in Interactive Spaces

    Making People in Interactive Spaces

    at ASU Art Museum
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    Making People in Interactive Spaces

    How does language define us? How do we use stories and performances to shape the world around us, to give it meaning? How can digital media give us a new, deeper understanding of the power of words to transform our reality?

    Join us for a performance of Simon Biggs, Sue Hawksley and Garth Paine’s Crosstalk, which interrogates these questions through live performance and a variety of digital elements including 3D infra-red motion tracking, voice acquisition, speech recognition, multi-screen video projection and multi-channel surround sound to create an immersive multimedia environment. Crosstalk builds on the work of anthropologist James Leach, who theorizes how people construct reality and one another through language, the social performative and ritualized practices of exchange.

    The performance will be followed by light refreshments and a conversation and Q+A with Crosstalk’s developers and performers, Garth Paine, Sue Hawksley and Simon Biggs; digital media theorist Xin Wei Sha, the incoming director of ASU’s School of Arts, Media and Engineering; and anthropologist Ana Magdalena Hurtado, a professor at ASU’s School of Human Evolution and Social Change and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

    This event is co-sponsored by ASU’s School of Arts, Media and Engineering, Center for Science and the Imagination, and the ASU Art Museum.

  • February 15, 2014 | 9:30am

    AZ Computer-Assisted Language Learning Conference 2014

    at Memorial Union Second Floor
    0

    AZ Computer-Assisted Language Learning Conference 2014

    AZ CALL (Computer-Assisted Language Learning) is a one-day annual conference that brings together computer-assisted language learning enthusiasts from Arizona and beyond to share ideas, network and receive valuable feedback on scholarly research, academic papers and major conference presentations which are in progress or preparation.

    The keynote address, “Quo Vadis? CALL Research and Practice” will be delivered from 3:00 – 4:00pm by Robert Blake, professor of Spanish at the University of California, Davis, founding director of the UC Language Consortium and author of the book Brave New Digital Classroom: Technology and Foreign Language Learning.

    RSVP Now to attend the conference, and learn more at the conference website.

    AZ CALL 2014 is coordinated by Bryan Smith, an associate professor of English at ASU, and is sponsored by the Department of English and the Center for Science and the Imagination.

  • January 30, 2014 | 4:30pm

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: Quantum Leap

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: Quantum Leap

    at ASU Polytechnic Student Union
    - Cooley Ballroom
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    Science Fiction TV Dinner: Quantum Leap

    Join the Center for Science and the Imagination for our first Science Fiction TV Dinner of 2014 with Quantum Leap, an early 1990s classic that blends science fiction, actual science, and time travel with sharp social and ethical insights.

    We’ll be screening the episode “The Wrong Stuff,” where genius physicist/time traveler hero Sam Beckett finds himself embroiled in a NASA research program in 1961, at the height of the Space Race between the US and the Soviet Union.

    Following the screening, Center for Science and the Imagination director Ed Finn will moderate a conversation featuring Juan José Diaz Infante, artist and mission director for the Mexican Space Collective, and Micah Lande, Assistant Professor in the Department of Engineering at ASU’s College of Technology and Innovation.

    Free dinner will be served at the event!

    Need help finding the ASU Polytechnic Student Union? Visit this page for a map and photos.

    This event is co-presented by the Center for Science and the Imagination and ASU’s College of Technology and Innovation

  • November 21, 2013 | 2:00pm

    Digital Humanities, Recursive Communities, and the Future of Scholarly Communication

    Digital Humanities, Recursive Communities, and the Future of Scholarly Communication

    at Social Sciences Building, Room 109
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    Digital Humanities, Recursive Communities, and the Future of Scholarly Communication

    Why do the digital humanities matter? From data-driven explorations of digitized texts to networked pedagogical experiments that connect classrooms across institutions and countries, the digital humanities is fostering new possibilities for academic work. Describing the broad contours of this emerging field and exploring in particular the areas of scholarly publishing and digital pedagogy, this talk builds on Christopher Kelty’s notion of “recursive publics” to argue that academics should play an active role in the creation and sustenance of the digital platforms they use, or soon will be, in their research and teaching.

    This lecture is a part of the launch of the Institute for Humanities Research Nexus Lab for Digital Humanities and Transdisciplinary Informatics. Coinciding with the IHR’s ongoing Digital Humanities Initiative, the Nexus Lab will incubate new digital projects and foster broadly-based collaborations and research partnerships. The lab will also explore computation as a means to empower humanities researchers to engage new questions and challenges.

    RSVP now and learn more about other Institute for Humanities research events for the launch of the Nexus Lab, including an open house at the Nexus Lab and a round table discussion with scholars from the humanities and arts, as well as Jaime Casap, Global Education Evangelist for Google!

    ______________________________

    Matthew K. Gold is Associate Professor of English and Digital Humanities at City Tech and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. At the Graduate Center, he holds teaching appointments in the Ph.D. Program in English, the M.A. in Liberal Studies Program, and the Interactive Technology and Pedagogy Doctoral Certificate Program, and he serves as Advisor to the Provost for Master’s Programs and Digital Initiatives, Director of the CUNY Academic Commons, Co-Director of the CUNY Digital Humanities Initiative, and Director of the GC Digital Scholarship Lab. He is editor of Debates in the Digital Humanitiesa scholarly anthology and open-access web platform. His digital humanities projects, including Looking for Whitman, Commons In A Box, and JustPublics@365 have been supported by grants from the NEH Office of Digital Humanities, the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Education, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and the Ford Foundation. He serves on the Executive Council of the Association for Computers and the Humanities and the editorial board of Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy. He can be found at mkgold.net and on twitter @mkgold.

     

    This event is sponsored by the Institute for Humanities Research and the School of International Letters and Cultures.

  • November 20, 2013 | 7:30pm

    Sci-Fi Meets Sci-Fact Lecture: Mars on a One-Way Ticket

    Sci-Fi Meets Sci-Fact Lecture: Mars on a One-Way Ticket

    at Murdock Hall Room 101, ASU Tempe
    0

    Sci-Fi Meets Sci-Fact Lecture: Mars on a One-Way Ticket

    This event is presented by ASU’s BEYOND: Center for Fundamental Concepts in Science

    Humans have long dreamed of going to Mars, but the only hope for doing so in the foreseeable future is on a one-way mission. Eliminating the return journey would dramatically slash costs and halve the inevitable risks associated with space flight. Mars on a one-way ticket is not a suicide mission. Rather, the astronauts would be the first colonists of a permanent human settlement on the red planet. But who would go, and what would they do when they got there? How would a Mars colony benefit the rest of humanity left on Earth? At this event, cosmologist and astrobiologist Paul Davies will outline his plan for sending humans one-way to Mars after which internationally acclaimed artist and senior TED fellow Angelo Vermeulen will describe his recent experience living and working in a Mars-like habitat.

    RSVP Now

    _________________________________________
    Paul Davies is a theoretical physicist, cosmologist, astrobiologist and best-selling author. He is director of ASU’s BEYOND: Center for Fundamental Concepts in Science and Center for the Convergence of Physical Science and Cancer Biology, as well as co-director of ASU’s Cosmology Initiative.  His research ranges from the origin of the universe to the origin of life, and includes the properties of black holes, the nature of time and quantum field theory. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the 1995 Templeton Prize, the 2002 Michael Faraday Prize from the Royal Society and the 2011 Robinson prize in Cosmology.

    Angelo Vermeulen is an artist, biologist, space systems researcher and community organizer. In his work he ties together technological, ecological, and social systems through group engagement and collaboration. ‘Biomodd’ is one of his most well-known art projects and consists of a worldwide series of interactive art installations in which computers and ecology coexist. In 2009 he launched ‘Space Ecologies Art and Design (SEAD)’, a platform for artistic research on the architectures and ethics of space colonization. ‘Seeker’ is one of the resulting projects involving co-created spaceship sculptures that evolve over time. He is a member of the European Space Agency Topical Team Arts & Science (ETTAS), and was the Crew Commander of the NASA-funded 2013 HI-SEAS Mars simulation in Hawaii. His space-related work led him to start a new PhD at Delft University of Technology, developing paradigm-shifting concepts for evolvable starships.

  • November 13, 2013 | 4:00pm

    Shell GameChanger: Innovation Challenges in a Large Energy Company

    Shell GameChanger: Innovation Challenges in a Large Energy Company

    at Wrigley Hall
    Room 481 ASU Tempe
    0

    Shell GameChanger: Innovation Challenges in a Large Energy Company

    A presentation by Henk Mooiweer and Hans Haringa, Shell GameChanger

    Since the mid-1990s Shell GameChanger has been bringing the practices of Silicon Valley into Shell. Key breakthroughs, worth billions today, had their origin in GameChanger. GameChanger is about search, discovery, experimentation, risk taking and collaboration. Some of the ideas developed through the GameChanger process are selected for further development and ultimately deployed by the Shell organization at large.

    The GameChanger journey has not been a smooth ride. GameChangers Henk Mooiweer and Hans Haringa will share how the practice managed to counterbalance the inevitable pull towards readily demonstrable business benefit, cultural conformity, predictability and control.

    Henk and Hans will also share some of their radical new thoughts around future-proofing the GameChanger practice against the backdrop of an increasingly democratized world of innovation. RSVP now!

    Presented by ASU’s LightWorks and Center for Science and the Imagination

     

    Need help finding Wrigley Hall? Visit this page for pictures of the building and a link to a map.

  • November 8, 2013 | 8:00pm

    Star Trek: The Next Generation with The Bad Astronomer Phil Plait

    Star Trek: The Next Generation with The Bad Astronomer Phil Plait

    at Armstrong Hall
    Room 113 (Great Hall) ASU Tempe
    0

    Star Trek: The Next Generation with The Bad Astronomer Phil Plait

    Explore strange worlds, seek out new life and new civilizations, and boldly go where no one has gone before with the Center for Science and the Imagination and Star Trek: The Next Generation. Join us for a screening of the episode “Evolution” and a conversation about space exploration, nanorobotics, and the ethical and scientific dimensions of synthetic life.

    The conversation will feature astronomer, lecturer, author and Slate blogger Phil Plait (a.k.a. The Bad Astronomer) and Karmella Haynes, a synthetic biology researcher at ASU’s School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering. Ed Finn, director of the Center for Science and the Imagination, will moderate.

    Note: Unlike our normal Science Fiction TV Dinners, we will not be serving a full meal at this event. Each guest will receive a special space-themed treat at the end of the evening!

    This event is co-sponsored by SpaceVision, the largest student-organized space conference in the nation. SpaceVision 2013 takes place at Arizona State University from November 7-10. Learn more at spacevision.seds.org.

    Need help finding Armstrong Hall? Visit this page for photos of the building and a link to a map. Paid parking for this event is available at ASU’s Rural Road Parking Structure.

     

    Image courtesy of Keithius on flickr.com, CC

  • November 7, 2013 | 5:30pm

    David Quammen: Animal Infections, Spillover, and the Threat of Pandemic

    David Quammen: Animal Infections, Spillover, and the Threat of Pandemic

    at ASU Marston Exploration Theater
    0

    David Quammen: Animal Infections, Spillover, and the Threat of Pandemic

    The next big and murderous human pandemic, the one that kills us in millions, will be caused by a new disease-new to humans, anyway. The bug that’s responsible will be strange, unfamiliar, but it won’t come from outer space. Odds are that the killer pathogen-most likely a virus-will spill over into humans from a nonhuman animal.

    David Quammen’s Spillover is a work of science reporting, history, and adventuresome travel, tracking this subject around the world. For five years, Quammen shadowed scientists into the field-a rooftop in Bangladesh, a forest in the Congo, a Chinese rat farm, a suburban woodland in Duchess County, New York-and through their high-biosecurity laboratories. He interviewed survivors and gathered stories of the dead. He found surprises in the latest research, alarm among public health officials, and deep concern in the eyes of researchers. Spillover delivers the science, the history, the mystery, and the human anguish as page-turning drama.

    From what innocent creature, in what remote landscape, will the Next Big One emerge? A rodent in southern China? A monkey in West Africa? A bat in Malaysia that happens to roost above a pig farm, from which hogs are exported to Singapore? In this age of speedy travel between dense human populations, an emerging disease can go global in hours. But where and how will it start? Recent outbreaks offer some guidance, and so Quammen traces the origins of Ebola, Marburg, SARS, avian influenza, Lyme disease, and other bizarre cases of spillover, including the grim, unexpected story of how AIDS began from a single Cameroonian chimpanzee.

    Spillover asks urgent questions. Are these events independent misfortunes, or linked? Are they merely happening to us, or are we somehow causing them? What can be done? But it’s more than a work of reportage. It’s also the tale of a quest, through time and landscape, for a new understanding of how the world works.

    Need help finding the Marston Exploration Theater? Click here for a map. Paid parking will be available in the Rural Road Parking Structure.

    This event is part of the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing Distinguished Visiting Writer’s series. It is co-sponsored by CSI as well as Barrett, the Honors College, the Institute for Humanities Research and the School of Letters and Sciences.

    About David Quammen

    David Quammen was born in 1948 and raised in the suburbs of Cincinnati, closely adjacent to a hardwood forest. It was here he spent much of his boyhood, until bulldozers came and scraped the forest away, a formative experience.  In 1973, after education at Yale and Oxford and the publication of one novel, he moved to Montana.  His second book, a spy novel, was released in 1983, and another spy novel, The Soul of Viktor Tronko, based on historical events in the case of a certain Russian defector, was published by Doubleday in 1987.  Blood Line: Stories of Fathers and Sons was published by Graywolf Press a year later.

    Quammen began to develop into a nonfiction writer, working as a columnist for Outside Magazine for 15 years. Selections of these columns, along with those from other magazines, comprise his four books of short nonfiction: Natural Acts (1985), The Flight of the Iguana (1988), Wild Thoughts from Wild Places (1998), and The Boilerplate Rhino (2000).  A revised, culled, and re-expanded edition of Natural Acts was published by W.W. Norton in 2008, and he has written four full-length nonfiction books: The Song of the Dodo (1996), Monster of God (2003), The Reluctant Mr. Darwin (2006), and Spillover (2012).

    Since 1999, Quammen has worked with National Geographic, beginning with a series of three stories about J. Michael Fay’s epic 2000-mile survey hike through the forests of Central Africa, an expedition that became known as the Megatransect. He now holds a position as Contributing Writer, and in 2004 wrote the National Geographic cover story “Was Darwin Wrong?,” which won the third of his National Magazine Awards.  He holds honorary doctorates from Montana State University and Colorado College, and has received a Rhodes scholarship, a Guggenheim fellowship, and a Lannan Literary Award for nonfiction.  From 2007 to 2009 he served a full three-year term as Wallace Stegner Professor of Western American Studies at Montana State University.  He lives in Bozeman with his wife, Betsy Gaines Quammen.

  • October 2, 2013 | 1:45pm

    David Brin: Science Fiction and The Future of Journalism

    David Brin: Science Fiction and The Future of Journalism

    at A. E. England Building
    Auditorium ASU Downtown Phoenix
    0

    David Brin: Science Fiction and The Future of Journalism

    What will journalism, fact-checking and the information economy look like in the future? How will our experience of current events be transformed by smart mobs, ubiquitous computing and intelligent algorithms? What will the business of news look like in an era of superabundant information?

    Visionary science fiction author and scientist David Brin’s latest novel, Existence, provides a compelling glimpse into the future of journalism. Join David for a conversation about how science fiction can help us understand the complex social, economic and technological processes that will shape how we receive, share, debate and react to breaking news in the future.

    The conversation will be moderated by Ed Finn, director of the Center for Science and the Imagination, and will feature Alexander Halavais, a scholar of social media at ASU’s School of Social and Behavioral Sciences; Dawn Gilpin, who studies public relations, identity and complexity theory at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication; and Retha Hill, executive director of the Digital Innovation and Entrepreneurship Lab at the Cronkite School.

  • October 23, 2013 | 7:00pm

    Science Fiction Evening Snack: Interfaces and the Future of Design

    Science Fiction Evening Snack: Interfaces and the Future of Design

    at Stauffer Hall
    Room 125 ASU Tempe
    0

    Science Fiction Evening Snack: Interfaces and the Future of Design

    Make It So with Nathan Shedroff

    Interfaces in sci-fi serve a primarily narrative purpose. They’re there to help tell the story of how a character disables the tractor beam, or hacks into the corporate database, or diagnoses the alien infection. But what would happen if we tried to build these same interfaces for the real world? Some would fare just fine. Most would need a little redesign. A few appear to be just plain stupid or broken. They couldn’t work the way they appear to. That is, until you use the technique of apologetics to discover that in fact far from being stupid, they’re brilliant. Join Nathan Shedroff, co-author of the book Make It So: Interaction Design Lessons from Sci-Fi (Rosenfeld Media, 2012), as he discusses this critical technique, shows how it works across several sci-fi interfaces, and challenges the audience to apologize for some other “bad” sci-fi interfaces. Stick around for a “Snack Chat” Q & A with Nathan on storytelling, strategy and how designers can prepare for the future.

    —–

    Nathan Shedroff is the chair of the ground-breaking MBA in Design Strategy at California College of the Arts (CCA) in San Francisco, Calif. This program prepares the next-generation of innovation leaders for a world that is profitable, sustainable, ethical, and truly meaningful by uniting the perspectives of systems thinking, design thinking, sustainability and generative leadership into a holistic strategic framework.

    He is a pioneer in Experience Design, Interaction Design and Information Design, is a serial entrepreneur, and researches, speaks and teaches internationally about meaning, strategic innovation, and science fiction interfaces. His many books include: Experience Design 1.1, Making Meaning, Design is the Problem, Design Strategy in Action, and the new Make It So.

    He holds an MBA in Sustainable Management from Presidio Graduate School (San Francisco) and a BS in Industrial Design from Art Center College of Design (Pasadena, Calif.). He worked with Richard Saul Wurman at The Understanding Business and later co-founded vivid studios, a decade-old pioneering company in interactive media and one of the first Web services firms on the planet.vivid’s hallmark was helping to establish and validate the field of information architecture by training an entire generation of designers in the newly emerging Web industry.

    Nathan is on the board of directors for Teague and the AIGA.

  • October 1, 2013 | 1:45pm

    SICK: Book Launch and Zombie Romp

    SICK: Book Launch and Zombie Romp

    at Old Main, Carson Ballroom, ASU Tempe
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    SICK: Book Launch and Zombie Romp

    Look on as a zombie horde chases hapless high school drama students across the ASU campus and into historic Old Main. After the action, zombie ushers will escort audience members inside Old Main’s Carson Ballroom, where we’ll help launch Tom Leveen’s young adult novel Sick, about a group of high school drama misfits who fend off a zombie apocalypse in the school theater.

    Leveen will speak and sign books, and ASU scholars will present short programs on zombies in rhetorical analysis, literature, popular culture and as psychological phenomena. Presenters will include Peter Goggin, Emily Zarka and Shawn Mitchell of ASU’s Department of English.

    Hosted by the ASU Department of English’s English Education Program, the Center for Science and the Imagination and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, with support from Abrams Publishing.

    The event is free of charge and open to the public. RSVP Now!

    Need help finding Old Main? Visit this page for photos and a map.

  • October 1, 2013 | 7:00pm

    Shoemaker Lecture: David Brin, Humanity’s Place in a Very Strange Universe

    Shoemaker Lecture: David Brin, Humanity’s Place in a Very Strange Universe

    at Murdock Hall Room 101, ASU Tempe
    0

    Shoemaker Lecture: David Brin, Humanity’s Place in a Very Strange Universe

    Presented by ASU’s BEYOND Center for Fundamental Concepts in Science

    Our compulsion to make “sense of it all” used to be satisfied by myths and faith. Today, we probe for evidence that leads in surprising directions. As we learn about the intelligence of higher animals, the uniqueness of human sapience stands out. Just when we seem mentally ready to meet alien life, the cosmos suddenly looks stark and empty. New technologies may enhance – or replace – our definitions of personhood. And iconoclasts offer the disturbing theory that “the universe is all a simulation.” Four hundred years after Giordano Bruno was burned for asking questions like these, are we bound upon the greatest adventure of all?

    A book signing will follow the lecture. RSVP Now!

    Doors open at 6:30pm. Need help finding Murdock Hall? Find a photo and map here.

    David Brin is a scientist, speaker, technical consultant and author of fiction and non-fiction. His novels have been New York Times bestsellers, winning multiple Hugo, Nebula and other awards. He also holds a PhD in physics from the University of California, San Diego. To learn more about David, visit his website.

  • September 19, 2013 | 6:15pm

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: Red Dwarf

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: Red Dwarf

    at Barrett, the Honors College
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    Science Fiction TV Dinner: Red Dwarf

    Location: Cottonwood Hall, Room 101/103

    Map: http://goo.gl/oHnSRU

    Blast into the distant future with the Science Fiction TV Dinner series and BBC’s classic science fiction comedy, Red Dwarf! Join us for a conversation about space exploration, holograms, cat people and whether great science fiction can also be funny.

    The conversation will be moderated by Ed Finn, director of the Center for Science and the Imagination, and will feature Steven Desch, an astrophysicist and associate professor at ASU’s School of Earth and Space Exploration, and Don and Alleen Nilsen, ASU emeritus professors in English and the co-founders of the International Society for Humor Studies.

    This event is brought to you as part of ASU’s Project Humanities “Humor…Seriously!” Fall Kickoff week. Learn more at humanities.asu.edu

    Paid parking for this event is available at ASU’s Rural Road Parking Structure. Need help finding Cottonwood Hall? Click here for a map.

  • September 12, 2013 | 7:00pm

    Film Screening: SPECFLIC 1.9

    Film Screening: SPECFLIC 1.9

    at ASU Marston Exploration Theater
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    Film Screening: SPECFLIC 1.9

    Imagine: It is the year 2030. The weather is catastrophic. The university has been interiorized. New drugs are being tested. Students and faculty are research subjects. Surveillance is pervasive.

    Adriene Jenik, director of ASU’s School of Art, unveils her new film SPECFLIC 1.9, which imagines the near future of a public research university.

    RSVP now!

    SPECFLIC 1.9 embraces the limitless human potential made possible through computer-enabled global network connectivity, even as it considers the cultural impact of new levels of control made possible through these very networks and protocols. The film asks viewers to tease out the threads of their own present storylines to better imagine and therefore shape our shared future. The screening will be followed by a Q+A with Adriene.

    Paid parking for this event is available at ASU’s Rural Road Parking Structure. Need help finding the ISTB4 building? Visit this page for a map, and this page for a photo of the building.

    This event is held in conjunction with an Institute for Humanities Research Faculty Seminar entitled “Technology, Agency and Complicity: SPECFLIC 1.9” on Friday, September 13. For more information about the seminar, click here.

  • August 29, 2013 | 6:15pm

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: The Walking Dead

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: The Walking Dead

    at Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law
    0

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: The Walking Dead

    This event is presented by ASU’s Center for Science and the Imagination and Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law.

    The Science Fiction TV Dinner series has been reanimated for a new year! Join us for a screening of The Walking Dead and a conversation about death, taxes and zombies.

    The US stands on the precipice of financial disaster, and Congress has done nothing but bicker. Of course, we’re talking about the coming day when the undead walk the earth, feasting on the living. A zombie apocalypse will create an urgent need for massive government revenues to protect the living, while millions of taxpayers find themselves dead or undead. Adam Chodorow of ASU’s Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law joins us to warn the government, and the public, about the dangers of inaction in the face of the zombie crisis.

    Adam will join Ed Finn, director of the Center for Science and the Imagination, who will ponder why zombies continue to frighten and fascinate us 35 years after the release of George Romero’s genre-defining classic Dawn of the Dead.

    Paid parking for this event is available at ASU’s Rural Road Parking Structure.

    You can read Professor Chodorow’s article “Death and Taxes and Zombies” for free at the Iowa Law Review.

    Image courtesy of Med PhotoBlog, used under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 license.

  • September 4, 2013 | 7:30am

    AZ SciTech Festival Kickoff Conference

    AZ SciTech Festival Kickoff Conference

    at Scottsdale Center for the Arts
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    AZ SciTech Festival Kickoff Conference

    Educators, science professionals and science advocates – we hope to see you at the Arizona SciTech Festival Kickoff Conference on September 4 at the Scottsdale Center for the Arts! The Center for Science and the Imagination will be taking part in a panel titled “How Do Interdisciplinary Arts Foster Creative Thinking and Discovery?” from 1:00-2:oopm.

    The keynote speakers at the conference will be NASA astronaut Ed Gibson Geoff Notkin, co-star of the Science Channel show Meteorite Men.

    To attend the conference, register for free here. The conference runs continuously from 7:30am – 6:15pm. Check out the full program to get all of the details about the great lineup of panels, exhibits and keynotes.

     

    Image courtesy of Blogging Dagger, used under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 license.

  • September 10, 2013 | 6:15pm

    Walking the Dinosaur: Building T. Rex for Jurassic Park

    Walking the Dinosaur: Building T. Rex for Jurassic Park

    at ASU Marston Exploration Theater
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    Walking the Dinosaur: Building T. Rex for Jurassic Park

    T. Rex MouthEver wonder how they made the dinosaurs so scary for Jurassic Park? Join Michael Trcic, lead special effects artist of the T. Rex for Jurassic Park, as he discusses the journey of creation, from concept to life-size working model and the unplanned fate of the creature. He will also talk about his experiences working as a paleo-artist for a National Geographic documentary as well as working with horror and science fiction greats Sam Raimi, George Romero, and James Cameron.

    This event is co-presented by ASU’s Center for Film, Media, and Popular Culture and Center for Science and the Imagination.

     

    Photo courtesy of Michael Trcic

     

     

     

  • May 24, 2013 | 4:30pm

    Phoenix ComiCon Panel – Hieroglyph

    Phoenix ComiCon Panel – Hieroglyph

    at Phoenix Convention Center, West Building, Room 103
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    Phoenix ComiCon Panel – Hieroglyph

    How can we think more creatively and ambitiously about the future? It all begins with a good story. Hieroglyph teams up scientists and science fiction authors to reject gloomy dystopias and create inspiring, techno-optimistic visions of the future.

    Learn more about Hieroglyph on Slate and at hieroglyph.asu.edu

    Panelists

    Ed Finn
    Director, Center for Science and the Imagination; Assistant Professor, Arts, Media and Engineering / English, Arizona State University; Co-editor, Hieroglyph

    Kathryn Cramer
    Author, anthologist, critic and photographer; Co-editor, Hieroglyph

    Michael A. Stackpole
    Science fiction and fantasy author; Video game designer

    Keith Hjelmstad
    Professor of Structural Engineering

  • April 25, 2013 | 5:30pm

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: Doctor Who, “The Shakespeare Code”

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: Doctor Who, “The Shakespeare Code”

    at Language and Literature Building, Room 316
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    Science Fiction TV Dinner: Doctor Who, “The Shakespeare Code”

    Celebrate William Shakespeare’s birthday with Doctor Who! Join us for a screening of the episode “The Shakespeare Code” and a conversation about time travel, the Elizabethan era, TARDIS, Time Lords and how we can’t save the world without good stories.

    The conversation will be moderated by Ed Finn, director of the Center for Science and the Imagination, and will feature Bradley Ryner and Bambi Haggins of the Department of English and Paul Davies, theoretical physicist, director of the BEYOND Center and author of How to Build a Time Machine.

    Doctor Who is the world’s longest-running science fiction TV show in several universes, and among the most beloved and influential. Click here to learn more.

    This event is presented by the Arizona State University’s Department of English, Center for Science and the Imagination and BEYOND Center.

    Dinner will be provided.

    Parking: Paid parking for this event is available in ASU’s Fulton Center Parking Structure.

    Map: Need a map to the building? Click here.

    Presenter Bios

    Bradley Ryner is an assistant professor in the Department of English, an expert on Shakespearean drama in performance and the author of the forthcoming book Performing Economic Thought: English Drama and Mercantile Writing 1600-1642.

    Bambi Haggins is an associate professor in the Department of English whose research explores representations of class, ethnicity, gender, race and region in film, television and fandom. She is the author of the book Laughing Mad: The Black Comic Persona in Post Soul America.

    Ed Finn is the director of the Center for Science and the Imagination and an assistant professor with a joint appointment in the School of Arts, Media and Engineering and the Department of English.

    Paul Davies is a theoretical physicist, cosmologist, astrobiologist and director of the BEYOND Center for Fundamental Concepts in Science at ASU. He is the author of many bestselling books, including How to Build a Time Machine and About Time: Einstein’s Unfinished Revolution.

     

    Image courtesy of Pellaeon, used under CC BY 2.0 license. Thanks Pellaeon!

  • April 9, 2013 | 4:30pm

    Cu29: Mining for You – Student Panel and Celebration

    Cu29: Mining for You – Student Panel and Celebration

    0

    Cu29: Mining for You – Student Panel and Celebration

    Cu29: Mining for You

    Join us at the ASU Art Museum’s Cu29: Mining for You exhibit for free pizza, live music and a panel to showcase student work moderated by Ed Finn of the Center for Science and the Imagination! The online version of the Cu29 exhibit will also be unveiled at the event.

    Tired of carrying around loose change? Empty your pockets and help us complete the exhibit’s epic wall of pennies!

    Time: 4:30 – 7:00pm

    Click here to learn more about the exhibit.

    Co-sponsored by the ASU Art Museum and the HDA 410/510 seminar in Socially Engaged Practice.

  • April 10, 2013 | 4:00pm

    Global Networks of Innovation and Silicon Valley’s Ties to the Future

    at Payne Hall, Room 129
    0

    Global Networks of Innovation and Silicon Valley’s Ties to the Future

    Join Tracey Grose, an expert on the clean energy economy, innovation systems and growing global linkages, for a presentation and conversation with G. Pascal Zachary, professor of practice at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication and Ed Finn, director of the Center for Science and the Imagination.

    This event is co-hosted by the Phoenix American Council on Germany Eric M. Warburg Chapter

    Abstract: On the topic of global competitiveness, we hear a great deal of rhetoric reflecting a zero-sum view of the world. If one country is improving its economic performance, it is perceived to be at the cost of another. The reality of the situation is that the world’s innovation hubs are becoming increasingly interdependent. Looking at Silicon Valley as an example, how are global linkages of collaboration growing and how are they changing over time? And what are possible implications for the much needed global energy transformation away from fossil fuels?

    Light refreshments will be served.

    Parking: Paid parking for this event is available at ASU’s Lot 20 and the Fulton Center Parking Structure. You can find other parking options at https://cfo.asu.edu/pts-visitor-tempe.

  • April 1, 2013 | 4:00pm

    Imaginative Skeptics: Doubt, Conviction and Writing with Lawrence Krauss and Ian McEwan

    Imaginative Skeptics: Doubt, Conviction and Writing with Lawrence Krauss and Ian McEwan

    at Old Main
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    Imaginative Skeptics: Doubt, Conviction and Writing with Lawrence Krauss and Ian McEwan

    Room: Basha Library (2nd floor)

    How do you get people to believe a story about not believing? Join ASU’s Lawrence Krauss, theoretical physicist and author of A Universe from Nothing, and Ian McEwan, Booker Prize-winning novelist and author of Sweet Tooth and Solar, for a conversation about skepticism, rationality and the writer’s imagination.

    At 5:30, Dr. Krauss and Mr. McEwan will be available to sign books, and the ASU Bookstore will be on hand to sell selected titles by both authors.

    Co-sponsored by ASU’s Center for Science and the Imagination and Origins Project

    Paid parking for this event is available in ASU’s Fulton Center Parking Structure

  • March 2, 2013 | 7:00pm

    Emerge2013

    Emerge2013

    at Neeb Hall
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    Emerge2013

    Celebration and performances

     

    Need information on parking? Click here.

    More schedule details available at http://emerge2013.asu.edu/schedule

  • March 2, 2013 | 5:00pm

    Emerge2013

    Emerge2013

    at Neeb Hall
    0

    Emerge2013

    Join us for truth elixirs, laser-cut rock art, flash mobs, food trucks, vast crowds of masked faces, Native American rock music, cyborgs and 3D printers.

    Emerge unites artists, engineers, scientists, storytellers and designers to build, draw, write and rethink the future of the human species and the environments that we share.

    This year, Emerge tackles The Future of Truth and explores the conflicting stories we tell about reality, justice, reason, facts and values.

    Food trucks, truth elixirs, atmospheric performances by Rachel BowditchDigital Culture Showcase and more

     

    Need information on parking? Click here.

    More schedule details available at http://emerge2013.asu.edu/schedule

  • March 27, 2013 | 5:30pm

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: Twilight Zone

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: Twilight Zone

    at Barrett, the Honors College
    0

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: Twilight Zone

    Room: Cottonwood 101/103

    Join us for a screening of the classic Twilight Zone episode “Number 12 Looks Just Like You” and a conversation about biotechnology, ethics and the connections between visions of human perfection and ideas about race, gender and social class.

    The conversation will be moderated by Ed Finn, director of the Center for Science and the Imagination, and will feature Thomas Martin and Joe Foy, faculty fellows at Barrett, the Honors College, and Georganne Scheiner Gillis, professor of Women and Gender Studies.

    Free dinner will be provided from Pita Jungle!

  • February 11, 2013 | 10:30am

    Cory Doctorow joins ASU faculty and local technology entrepreneurs to discuss hacking and activism.

    Hackers + Activism: Aaron Swartz, Anonymous and the Ethics of Digital Community

    at ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication
    0

    Hackers + Activism: Aaron Swartz, Anonymous and the Ethics of Digital Community

    Watch live csi.asu.edu/doctorow

    The prosecution and recent suicide of digital innovator and activist Aaron Swartz and the increasingly public actions of the hacker collective Anonymous have brought unprecedented attention to the role of hacktivism in our digital world. Is hacking an effective form of activism? Is it ethical? Is it safe? What rights and responsibilities do citizens have in an increasingly corporatized digital world? What is the future of privacy, civic protest, and community building?

    Discuss these questions and more with prolific author and activist Cory Doctorow and a panel of experts including Ed Finn, director of ASU’s Center for Science and the Imagination, Dawn Gilpin, assistant professor at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication and Jade Meskill, co-founder of collaborative workspace Gangplank.

    Panelists

    Cory Doctorow is a science fiction author, activist, journalist and blogger — the co-editor of Boing Boing and the author of young adult novels like PIRATE CINEMA and LITTLE BROTHER and novels for adults like RAPTURE OF THE NERDS and MAKERS. He is the former European director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation and co-founded the UK Open Rights Group. Born in Toronto, Canada, he now lives in London.

    Dawn Gilpin is an assistant professor of Public Relations and Social Media at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication of Arizona State University. Her research interests focus on complex systems and processes in communication, particularly in the context of big-picture ideas such as identity, privacy, reputation, issues, and crises.

    Jade Meskill is the CEO of Integrum, a group obsessed with team improvement and organizational transformation; and co-founder of Gangplank, a collaborative workspace for creative people and innovative companies in Metro Phoenix.

    Guests who have RSVPed will receive more information about options for paid parking closer to the event date. 

  • February 21, 2013 | 5:00pm

    Geeks’ Night Out

    at Tempe City Hall
    0

    Geeks’ Night Out

    Join us for ASU Venture Catalyst Geek Week and Geeks’ Night Out sponsored by the Walton Sustainability Solutions Initiatives. We’re blending science, technology and fun to celebrate the Arizona SciTech Festival. Best of all, the events are free.

  • January 25, 2013 | 11:30am

    CSI Breakfast

    at Changemaker Central - Tempe Campus
    0

    CSI Breakfast

  • January 19, 2013 | 10:00am

    Green Expo

    at Tempe Center for the Arts
    0

    Green Expo

    CSI is participating in the Green Expo at Tempe Center for the Arts. The City of Tempe and Smithsonian are teaming to celebrate green art, green business and green living.

  • February 14, 2013 | 6:00pm

    Image by Paul Lowry on flickr.com, CC license

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: Valentine’s Day Edition

    at ASU Polytechnic
    0

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: Valentine’s Day Edition

    Join Micah Lande and Angela Sodemann of the College of Technology and Innovation to watch and discuss the 2007 version of The Bionic Woman, science fiction, cyborgs, design and the future of humanity.

    Free dinner will be provided! Visitor parking details are available here

    Angela Sodemann is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Engineering in the College of Technology and Innovation at ASU. Angela came to ASU from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Air Force Institute of Technology, where she performed research in Artificial Intelligence and Machine Vision in collaboration with the Air Force Research Laboratories.

    Micah Lande is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Engineering in the College of Technology and Innovation at ASU. Micah teaches human-centered design innovation and researches how engineers and makers learn and apply a design process to their work. He has been an Editor-in-Chief of Ambidextrous Journal of Design, producing issues that captured stories of the people and processes of design.

    Presented in partnership with the ASU Project Humanities Spring Kickoff, “Heroes, Superheroes & Superhumans.” Learn more at humanities.asu.edu

  • September 12, 2012 | 1:00pm

    Alan Dean Foster: Star Trek “Arena”

    Alan Dean Foster: Star Trek “Arena”

    0

    Alan Dean Foster: Star Trek “Arena”

  • October 26, 2012 | 2:00pm

    Kim Stanley Robinson: Landscape, Art  and Other Worlds

    Kim Stanley Robinson: Landscape, Art and Other Worlds

    0

    Kim Stanley Robinson: Landscape, Art and Other Worlds

  • December 12, 2012 | 6:30pm

    How Do We Make Sense of Genius? Matthew Guerrieri

    How Do We Make Sense of Genius? Matthew Guerrieri

    at Heard Museum
    0

    How Do We Make Sense of Genius? Matthew Guerrieri

    A Zócalo/ASU Center for Science and the Imagination Event
    Moderated by T.A. Frank, Editor, Zócalo Public Square
    Name the following piece of music: Da-da-da-DUM. If you guessed Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony, you were right—and not alone. The Fifth may be the most famous piece of music ever written, and it has thrilled audiences for over 200 years. But why? We’ve argued for centuries over what distinguishes the sublime from the average. We’re mystified by the workings of genius, no matter how many records it leaves. (Think of Einstein’s Zurich notebooks or Beethoven’s countless letters and musical jottings.) We struggle to cultivate the imagination or “creativity,” yet we have little sense of how to do it and few indications we’ve made any progress in our understanding since the days of Aristotle. Boston Globe music critic Matthew Guerrieri, author of The First Four Notes: Beethoven’s Fifth and the Human Imagination, a book about the history, legacy, and interpretations of Beethoven’s most famous work, visits Zócalo to discuss the mysteries of genius and the human imagination.

    RSVP

  • March 2, 2013 | 9:00am

    Emerge2013

    Emerge2013

    at Neeb Hall
    0

    Emerge2013

    Join us for truth elixirs, laser-cut rock art, flash mobs, food trucks, vast crowds of masked faces, Native American rock music, cyborgs and 3D printers.

    Emerge unites artists, engineers, scientists, storytellers and designers to build, draw, write and rethink the future of the human species and the environments that we share.

    This year, Emerge tackles The Future of Truth and explores the conflicting stories we tell about reality, justice, reason, facts and values.

    Public unveiling of products from our exciting workshops and keynotes from our distinguished guests, including:

    • Science fiction legend Bruce Sterling
    • Mythologist Betty Sue Flowers
    • Visual futurist Syd Mead
    • Knowledge enterprise architect and ASU President Michael Crow
    • Artist and engineer Natalie Jeremijenko
    • Theoretical physicist Paul Davies

    RSVP

  • January 23, 2013 | 6:30pm

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: The X-Files

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: The X-Files

    at ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication
    0

    Science Fiction TV Dinner: The X-Files

    FBI badges of Mulder and ScullyLocation: ASU Downtown Phoenix Campus, Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication

    Join Gregg Pascal Zachary and Retha Hill of the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication and Ed Finn of the Center for Science and the Imagination to watch and discuss The X-Files, science fiction and the search for truth.

    Free dinner will be provided.

    Image courtesy of megaul under Creative Commons license

  • November 30, 2012 | 10:00am

    CSI Breakfast

    at West Hall
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    CSI Breakfast

    Room 135
    Join us for the first Science and Imagination Breakfast event of the 2012-2013 academic year!
    Network with faculty, students and staff engaged in interdisciplinary research and exploration around science, imagination and the future. Get news and updates about Center for Science and the Imagination partnerships, projects and events.
    Coffee and light refreshments will be served.
    RSVP

  • January 7, 2013 | 11:59pm

    Green Dreams deadline

    Green Dreams deadline

    0

    Green Dreams deadline

    The Tomorrow Project USA and the Center for Science and the Imagination present this writing challenge, open to college students everywhere.

    Imagine a sustainable future we can build together. Write it. Get published. Win $200.

    Enter your work >>

  • November 27, 2012 | 6:30pm

    Science Fiction TV Series: Jetsons edition

    Science Fiction TV Series: Jetsons edition

    0

    Science Fiction TV Series: Jetsons edition

    Science Fiction TV Series: The Jetsons
    Tuesday, November 27, 6:00 – 7:30 pm

    Memorial Union 242 (La Paz Room), ASU Tempe campus

    RSVP at http://asujetsons.eventbrite.com

    Since 1962, The Jetsons has defined an iconic vision of the future, imagining a course of progress that blends high technology with familiar social and cultural values.
    Yinong Chen and Karin Ellison will join CSI director Ed Finn to discuss The Jetsons and interpret what it tells us about robotics, the nuclear family, and the peculiar relationships that form between humans and technology.
    Yinong Chen is an expert in robotics and computing, and a Senior Lecturer in the School of Computing, Informatics, and Decision Systems Engineering at ASU. Dr. Chen directs ASU’s Robotics Camps for middle and high school students, organizes the Arizona Robotics Challenge, and serves as advisor for the ASU Robotics Team.
    Karin Ellison is the Associate Director of the Center for Biology and Society and a Dean’s Faculty Fellow in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at ASU. Dr. Ellison is an expert in the history of science and technology, specifically the institutional history of American science and technology and the history of engineers and engineering in the US.
    Think we’re the only ones taking The Jetsons seriously? Read more in the Smithsonian magazine.


    Here are some photos of the event. Thank you to all those who participated!

  • November 27, 2012 | 3:30pm

    Write-In:Green Dreams

    at Changemaker Central - Tempe Campus
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    Write-In:Green Dreams

    Here are some photos of the event. Thank you to those who participated!

    RSVP

  • November 19, 2012 | 4:30pm

    Write-In:Green Dreams

    Write-In:Green Dreams

    at Changemaker Central - Tempe Campus
    0

    Write-In:Green Dreams

    Here are some photos of the event. Thank you to those who participated!

    RSVP

  • November 14, 2012 | 2:00pm

    Write-In: Green Dreams

    at Wrigley Hall
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    Write-In: Green Dreams

    Here are some photos of the event. Thank you to those who participated!

    Photo courtesy of the Arizona State Press

    RSVP

  • November 9, 2012 | 3:00pm

    Write-In:Green Dreams

    at Memorial Union Second Floor
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    Write-In:Green Dreams

    Image courtesy of Julie Jordan Scott

    RSVP

  • September 24, 2012 | 3:30pm

    Launch

    Launch

    at Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Building IV
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    Launch

    Join us at the recently completed ISTB4 building for the launch of the ASU Center for Science and the Imagination, an institutional platform for ambitious thinking and creative collaboration between the humanities, arts and sciences. President Michael Crow and Intel futurist Brian David Johnson will join Center Director Ed Finn to discuss upcoming projects and events, including the announcement of an exciting new partnership with Intel. Following this we will lead the audience in an act of collective imagination, encouraging ASU students, faculty, staff and community members to share their big ideas for the future.

    Take this opportunity to explore the new ISTB4 facility, which features a suite of interactive earth and space exhibits, as well as the world’s largest university-based meteorite collection. A reception with light refreshments will follow the event.