Slow Catastrophes, Uncertain Revivals

The stories were created by students in “Slow Catastrophes, Speculative Futures, Science & Imagination: Rewriting and Rethinking Sustainability,” a course designed and taught by Dr. Michele Speitz at Furman University in South Carolina. The course and the stories were inspired by Project Hieroglyph, and particularly by our first anthology, Hieroglyph: Stories and Visions for a Better Future (HarperCollins, 2014), which the students read and discussed throughout the course.

Project Hieroglyph Book Launch: Phoenix, AZ

Launch event for Project Hieroglyph’s first anthology, Hieroglyph: Stories and Visions for a Better Future (HarperCollins, 2014) at the Crescent Ballroom in Phoenix, AZ on October 22, 2014.

Project Hieroglyph on Slate’s Future Tense Channel

Slate magazine’s Future Tense channel is running a series of stories inspired by and excerpted from Hieroglyph: Stories and Visions for a Better Future, exploring about the connections between science fiction storytelling, scientific discovery, public policy, and real-world innovation. Check back to this post for updates as more pieces are published! Elizabeth Bear, “Story: Covenant” Joey Eschrich, “Forget the Tricorder: Why […]

To the Best of Our Knowledge

CSI and Imagining Possible Futures on Public Radio

This article originally appeared on ASU News Ed Finn, director of ASU’s Center for Science and the Imagination, and an assistant professor in the School of Arts, Media and Engineering and the Department of English, was featured on the public radio program To the Best of Our Knowledge, in an episode titled “Imagining Possible Worlds,” about science […]

ASTC 2013 Keynote – A Conversation with Neal Stephenson

The Association of Science-Technology Centers, a global organization of science centers and museums dedicated to increasing public engagement with science, hosted their annual conference for 2013 in Albuquerque, NM. Neal Stephenson and Ed Finn participated in a keynote dialog on October 21 about Project Hieroglyph, founded by Neal and headquartered at ASU’s Center for Science and the Imagination.

During the conversation, Neal and Ed discuss the history and mission of Project Hieroglyph and Neal’s Tall Tower project, the power of storytelling to inspire people about science and technology, and the ongoing tension between dystopian thinking and Project Hieroglyph’s quest for thoughtfully optimistic visions of the future. The conversation was moderated by Alex Zwissler, Executive Director and CEO of the Chabot Space and Science Center in Oakland, CA.