Bicentennial of Frankenstein Inspires Global Contest for New Stories about Science and Creation

Two hundred years after Mary Shelley came up with the vision for the story that would become Frankenstein, Arizona State University, National Novel Writing Month, Chabot Space and Science Center, and Creative Nonfiction magazine will launch a series of writing “dares” to inspire the public to imagine new stories about science, technology and the impact of creation.

Futurist Brian David Johnson talking with students about futurism and robotics at Mater Christi School in Burlington, Vermont.

Futurist Brian David Johnson leaves Intel, joins Arizona State University

Renowned futurist, technologist, and author Brian David Johnson, who left his position at the Intel Corporation in January, will be joining Arizona State University as Futurist in Residence for spring 2016 at the Center for Science and the Imagination and as a Professor of Practice in the School for the Future of Innovation in Society.

Three icons: one representing a museum building displayed on a laptop screen; one displaying a number of people holding maker and DIY tools; and one representing a toolbox with a variety of science-themed objects inside. Dotted arrow lines connect the three images to one another.

Using digital storytelling to grapple with scientific progress

Researchers at Arizona State University have received a four-year, $3 million grant from the National Science Foundation to use the interactive, engaging nature of digital narratives to invite deeper conversations about questions of scientific creativity and responsibility.

Cover of the "Journeys through Time and Space" anthology, featuring a black hole rendered in shades of orange and blue.

Science fiction anthology explores futures shaped by journeys through time and space

Just in time for the United Nations’ World Space Week (October 4-10, 2015) comes Journeys through Time and Space, a new anthology of creative, thought-provoking visions of the future shaped by excursions through space and time, and into the labyrinthine caverns of the human mind.

Overlooking an ocean, a fictional piece of land resembling an island appears to be levitating. Long, ropy vines connect the floating island to other pieces of the mainland. On the floating island, we see a small mountain, a forest, and rocky terrain below.

Contest challenges writers to imagine futures shaped by climate change

The Imagination and Climate Futures Initiative at Arizona State University invites writers to submit short stories that explore climate change, science and human futures for its first Climate Fiction Short Story Contest. The submission deadline is Jan. 15, 2016, and contest entry is free. The contest will be judged by science fiction legend Kim Stanley Robinson.

September 17: Paolo Bacigalupi to imagine Southwest water futures at ASU

In Paolo Bacigalupi’s most recent science fiction novel, The Water Knife, Phoenix is dried up and California and Nevada are not too far behind. The millions of people who rely on the Colorado River to survive are not only thirsty, but fighting for their lives. It’s a compelling story that captures a not-so-distant future. Will Phoenix eventually collapse? Will the river dry up?

The cover of the book “The Water Knife,” by Paolo Bacigalupi. The title is shown in a water-like font, dripping down the cover, but the words “The Water Knife” are still clear and legible.

Author Paolo Bacigalupi to imagine Southwest water wars at ASU on Sept. 17

In Paolo Bacigalupi’s most recent science fiction novel, The Water Knife, Phoenix is dried up and California and Nevada are not too far behind. The millions of people who rely on the Colorado River to survive are not only thirsty, but fighting for their lives. It’s a compelling story that captures a not-so-distant future. Will […]

Science fiction anthology explores biological, environmental visions of the future

Imagine a world devoid of animal life except for humans. Or a future where medical advances enable people to live for hundreds upon hundreds of years. Would life be as sweet if there was no end in sight, or without our pets to greet us at the door at the end of a long day? These are just a few of the quandaries explored in “Living Tomorrow,” a new anthology of creative, thought-provoking visions of the future crafted by young people ages 13-25 from across the United States and worldwide.

Leonardo da Vinci - Codex Leicester exhibit

Activity stations blend discovery, imagination at Leonardo exhibit

CSI has designed a number of activity stations that are integrated into Phoenix Art Museum’s “Leonardo da Vinci’s Codex Leicester and the Power of Observation” exhibit. The stations encourage visitors to engage in critical and creative thinking and making, and the activities are designed to provide hands-on experiences for visitors to explore a key theme of the exhibit: thinking on paper.