• Exciting Spring 2015 Courses at ASU English: Frankenstein and Jane Austen

    Exciting Spring 2015 Courses at ASU English: Frankenstein and Jane Austen

    This piece is written by Luu Nguyen, and was originally published at ASU News. One of CSI’s major upcoming projects is the Frankenstein Bicentennial Project, which will…

    Exciting Spring 2015 Courses at ASU English: Frankenstein and Jane Austen

    This piece is written by Luu Nguyen, and was originally published at ASU News. One of CSI’s major upcoming projects is the Frankenstein Bicentennial Project, which will organize a broad range of activities to celebrate the bicentennial of the writing and publication of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein from 2016-2018. 

    Dubbing the mash-up “Beauty and the Beast,” the Arizona State University’s Department of English presents two separately offered spring 2015 hybrid courses – one on Frankenstein and the other on Jane Austen – in the same time slot, to help students make the most of their packed schedules.

    Both literature-based offerings meet from 9 to 10:15 a.m., Tuesdays and Thursdays, alternating in-class and hybrid days. Students may take just one course or both.

    “Frankenstein and Its Others” (ENG 401) is taught by Mark Lussier, professor and chair of the English department. His course meets in person on Thursdays and online on Tuesdays. Students will delve into not only the written works about this “hideous progeny,” but will uncover how the Frankenstein novels influenced classic cinema as well.

    Texts to be explored include Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (which inspired many others), as well as Percy Shelley’s Prometheus Unbound, Robert Louis Stevenson’s Dr. Jeykyll and Mr. Hyde and H. G. Wells’ The Island of Dr. Moreau. Film adaptions of these works include Gothic (1986), Blade Runner (1982) and Frankenstein Unbound (1990), among others.

    In celebration of the upcoming Frankenstein bicentennial (1818-2018), this class is a unique starting point for the university’s bicentennial project, exploring the intersection of science and literature to bring the creature alive once more.

    “Jane Austen (Women & Literature)” (ENG 364) introduces all things Jane Austen in an unusual team-taught structure, meeting in person on Tuesdays and online on Thursdays. The course, jokingly described as “married couple argues about Austen and tries to teach you something in the process,” is instructed by Austen scholars Devoney Looser and George Justice, who are husband and wife. They are both professors of English; Justice also serves as dean of Humanities in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

    Texts to be discussed include Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility, Emma, Persuasion and shorter works, including her raucous juvenilia. The course will explore Austen’s humor, irony and social criticism, looking at the ways she’s been used in popular culture.

    In answering the questions, “Why is Jane Austen so popular?” and “Is she just the author of ‘chick lit,’ best served up with zombies or vampires?” the course dissects historical and contemporary Jane Austen fandom. Looser and Justice hope that students come away with knowledge about Austen and about how reading her can inform new understandings of literature, love and life.

    Interested students may visit the Department of English’s website for enrollment information.

  • Imaginary College member G. Pascal Zachary on Technology Scholar Thomas P. Hughes

    CSI Imaginary College member G. Pascal Zachary wrote an article in the Spring 2014 issue of The New Atlantis: A Journal of Technology and Society remembering the…

    Imaginary College member G. Pascal Zachary on Technology Scholar Thomas P. Hughes

    CSI Imaginary College member G. Pascal Zachary wrote an article in the Spring 2014 issue of The New Atlantis: A Journal of Technology and Society remembering the late, great Thomas P. Hughes, a historian and sociologist of technology:

    Whenever I receive inquiries about the effects of technological change on American society, my response is to steer students away from the hype and embellishment of today’s tech writing, which has drained words like “innovation,” “progress,” and “advancement” of meaning. Instead, I ask them to read and reread the work of historian Thomas P. Hughes, who died in February 2014 at the age of ninety. Hughes helped to found two related disciplines: the history of technology and the sociology of technology (and its misunderstood sibling, science). He was revered by scholars but largely unknown outside academia; the New York Times, for instance, failed to run an obituary. Hughes’s work exhibited a rare capacity to build meaningful bridges between academic silos and, although he never found a wide audience, to address the broader public without condescension, dumbing-down, or weakly tying his content to fleeting enthusiasms.

    Read the full article at The New Atlantis.

  • SciFiTV Podcast: Buffy the Vampire Slayer

    Event date: October 8, 2014
    Location: ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication
    Speakers: Bridget Kromhout, tech operations engineer; Astrid Atkinson, senior engineering manager, Google; Dawn Gilpin, associate professor of public relations and social media, ASU; Nina Miller, design strategist, Center for Science and the Imagination

    SciFiTV Podcast: Buffy the Vampire Slayer

    Event date: October 8, 2014
    Location: ASU Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication
    Episode: “Intervention” (Season 5)
    Speakers: Bridget Kromhout, tech operations engineer; Astrid Atkinson, senior engineering manager, Google; Dawn Gilpin, associate professor of public relations and social media, ASU; Nina Miller, design strategist, Center for Science and the Imagination

  • SciFiTV Podcast: House, MD

    Event date: September 30, 2014
    Location: Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts
    Episode: “Cane and Able” (Season 3)
    Speakers: Cathy Seiler, scientific liaison, ASU Biodesign Institute; Kenneth S. Ramos, associate vice president of precision health services, Arizona Health Sciences Center; Joey Eschrich, editor and program manager, Center for Science and the Imagination

    SciFiTV Podcast: House, MD

    Event date: September 30, 2014
    Location: Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts
    Episode: “Cane and Able” (Season 3)
    Speakers: Cathy Seiler, scientific liaison, ASU Biodesign Institute; Kenneth S. Ramos, associate vice president of precision health services, Arizona Health Sciences Center; Joey Eschrich, editor and program manager, Center for Science and the Imagination