2022/23 Annual Report

Publications

2022/23 Annual Report

Center for Science and the Imagination celebrates 10 years

Book cover for "Imagining Transmedia." The book's title is in bright yellow type against a black background. The cover is dominated by a white image of a plant or root structure with many overlapping tendrils.

Imagining Transmedia

A collection of essays exploring how the blurring of media forms—transmedia—became the default for how we experience narratives, and how that cultural transformation has redefined the worlds of education, entertainment, and our increasingly polarized public discourse.

A book cover for The Climate Action Almanac, featuring the book's title and a series of colorful slices from illustrations of different landscapes, which depict environmental futures on the water, in the desert, and in wetlands.

The Climate Action Almanac

A collection of fiction, nonfiction, and art exploring positive climate futures, grounded in real science and in the complexities of diverse human and physical geographies.

Yellow cover with delicate white circles nested in each other to look like a tunnel with the words Visionary Histories David J. Staley

Visionary Histories

When someone says they want to know the future of something, what they are really saying is they want to know what the state or behavior of some complex adaptive system is going to be at point n in the future. Visionary Histories makes the case for the disciplined study of the future via the historical method, arguing that historians are well-positioned to anticipate the possible future behaviors of a wide variety of systems.  

Annual Report 2021/22

Center for Science and the Imagination Annual Report 2021-22 PDF Annual Report 2021-22 EPUB

Annual Report 2020/21

Annual Report 2020-2021 PDF Annual Report 2020-2021 EPUB

Annual Report 2019/20

Annual Report 2019/20 PDF Annual Report 2019/20 EPUB

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Using design-based research to improve peer help-giving in a middle school math classroom

Mawasi, A., Ahmed, I., Walker, E., Wang, S., Marasli, Z., Whitehurst, A., & Wylie, R.
International Conference on the Learning Sciences. 

Neutrality, “New” Digital Divide, and Openness Paradox: Equity in Learning Environments Mediated by Educational Technology

Areej Mawasi, Arizona State University Earl Aguilera, Frenso State University Ruth Wylie, Arizona State University Elisabeth Gee, Arizona State University

Facing the Pariah of Science: The Frankenstein Myth as a Social and Ethical Reference for Scientists

 Peter Nagy,  Ruth Wylie, Joey Eschrich, Ed Finn Science and Engineering Ethics

ISLS logo, a circle arrow with a starburst of 3 lines over it, with the letters ISLS

Co-Design for Learner Help-Giving Across Physical and Digital Contexts

Ahmed, I., Girotto, V., Mawasi, A., Whitehurst, A., Wylie, R., & Walker, E.
International Conference on the Learning Sciences

A close up photo of a computer screen with unreadable numbers and words stack on each other and all different colors.

Investigating help-giving behavior in a cross-platform learning environment

Ahmed, I., Mawasi, A., Wang, S., Wylie, R., Bergner, Y., Whitehurst, A., & Walker, E
International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Education

Approaches to Light

This biography of a dawn traces one particular sunrise through poetry, photography, and lived experience as it played out from four different vantage points on the San Francisco Peaks. This collection is inspired by James Turrell’s land art project at Roden Crater in Northern Arizona.

Everything Change: An Anthology of Climate Fiction, Volume II

A collection of short stories by an international group of authors, drawn from our 2018 Everything Change Climate Fiction Contest, plus a foreword by our lead judge, Kim Stanley Robinson.

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Annual Report 2018/19

Grey rectangles stacked on top of each other

The Enduring Influence of a Dangerous Narrative: How Scientists Can Mitigate the Frankenstein Myth

Bioethical Inquiry
Peter Nagy, Ruth Wylie, Joey Eschrich and Ed Finn

Drawn Futures: Arizona 2045

A science-based comic book for 5th through 8th grade students. Created by award-winning comics authors and advised by ASU sustainability scholar Dr. Paul Hirt, this original story envisions the near future of Arizona’s energy systems.

Annual Report 2017/18

Logo for the Wall Street Journal: the letters “WSJ” in black, all-caps against a textured beige background.

‘Frankenstein’ Has Become a True Monster

Ed Finn and David H. Guston The Wall Street Journal

Space Is Not a Void

By Joey Eschrich and Ed Finn
Future Tense – Slate

Artificial Intelligence Is Around the Corner. Educators Should Take Note

Michael Bennett
Education Week

Cover for Visions, Ventures, Escape Velocities: A collection of space Futures. Edited by Ed Finn and Joey Eschrich. Photo of the inside of a futuristic space station. A ship and planet can be seen outside the window.

Visions, Ventures, Escape Velocities: A Collection of Space Futures

Why should we go to space? Visions, Ventures, Escape Velocities takes on the challenge of imagining new stories at the intersection of public and private—narratives that use the economic and social history of exploration, as well as current technical and scientific research, to inform scenarios for the future of the “new space” era.

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The Rightful Place of Science: Frankenstein

A collection of essays by scholars, journalists, scientists, and policy experts, taking the bicentenary of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein as an occasion to explore issues of scientific creativity and responsibility.

Cover for Overview Stories in the Stratosphere

Overview: Stories in the Stratosphere

A collection of science fiction, art, and speculative timelines exploring the near future of the stratosphere. From Star Trek and 2001: A Space Odyssey to The Martian, great science fiction stories have shaped how we think about voyages into deep space—but what gripping confrontations and adventures might unfold in near space, above the clouds?

Ulises I

Ulises I is an art mission to space by the Colectivo Espacial Mexicano. This is a personal journal, photographic record, and collection of essays documenting the mission, by Juan José Díaz Infante and other collaborators. Note: This is a beta version of the Ulises I book.

Balancing Student Needs and Learning Theory in a Social Interactive Postdigital Textbook

Erin Walker, Ruth Wylie, Andreea Danielescu, James P. Rodriguez III, Ed Finn End-User Considerations in Educational Technology Design, IGI Global

Frankenstein Book Cover Frankenstein written in angular typeface. Written by Mary Shelley. Annotated for Scientists, Engineers, and Creators of all kinds. Edited by David H. Guston, Ed Finn, and Jason Scott Robert

Frankenstein: Annotated for Scientists, Engineers, and Creators of All Kinds

This edition of Frankenstein pairs the original 1818 version of the manuscript with annotations and essays by leading scholars exploring the social and ethical aspects of scientific creativity raised by this remarkable story. The result is a unique and accessible edition of one of the most thought-provoking and influential novels ever written.

What Algorithms Want

In this book, Ed Finn considers how the algorithm—in practical terms, “a method for solving a problem”—has its roots not only in mathematical logic but also in cybernetics, philosophy, and magical thinking.

Side view of a open book.

Why Frankenstein is a Stigma Among Scientists

Peter Nagy, Ruth Wylie, Joey Eschrich, Ed Finn Science and Engineering Ethics Download article

Annual Report 2016/17

Side view of a open book.

Talking to Bots: Symbiotic Agency and the Case of Tay

Gina Neff and Peter Nagy International Journal Of Communication Download article

Responsibility and Emerging Technologies: Experiences, Education and Beyond

By D.M. Bowman et al. Forward by Bennett, M., Bowman, D., Dijkstra, A.

Cover for Everything Change An Anthology of Climate Fiction. Foreword by Kim Stanley Robinson. Interview with Paolo Bacigalupi. Edited by Manjana Milkoreit Meredith Martinez and Joey Eschrich

Everything Change: An Anthology of Climate Fiction

Features short stories from our 2016 Climate Fiction Short Story Contest along with a foreword by science fiction legend and contest judge Kim Stanley Robinson, and an interview with renowned climate fiction author Paolo Bacigalupi.

Evolution and revolution in artificial intelligence in education.

Stitching Together Creativity and Responsibility: Interpreting Frankenstein Across Disciplines

By Megan K. Halpern, Jathan Sadowski, Joey Eschrich, Ed Finn, and David H. Guston Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society

Cover for Slow Catastrophes, Uncertain Revivals. Edited by Michele Speitz and Joey Eschrich Designed by Ariel Shamas. Blurred photo for tree branches.

Slow Catastrophes, Uncertain Revivals

A collection of research-based “fiction with footnotes” short stories about environmental futures, created by students in Dr. Michele Speitz’s course “Slow Catastrophes, Speculative Futures, Science & Imagintion” at Furman University in South Carolina.

Annual Report 2015/16

What Algorithms Want

We spend an awful lot of time now thinking about what algorithms know about us: the ads we see online, the deep archive of our search history, the automated photo-tagging of our families. We don’t spend as much time asking what algorithms want.

Fluxing Futures: A Practitioner’s Guide to Probable Near-Term Developments in Publicity Rights Law

By Michael G. Bennett and Libbie Richards, Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment & Technology Law

The Internet of Slow Things

Higher education is obsessed with 3-D printing. Makerspaces and fab labs are sprouting like extruded weeds on college campuses, and everyone from business school deans to librarians are asking how 3-D printing and fabrication can be implemented in teaching.

Journeys Through Time and Space

Whether we’re crossing oceans, blasting off into space, migrating to distant unknown lands, or pursuing voyages of discovery within our own minds, we learn about who we are and who we want to become by traversing time, space and the imagination. In this volume, eleven young authors explore human futures shaped by excursions through space and time, and into the labyrinthine caverns of the human mind.

Personalized expert skeleton scaffolding in concept map construction

Shang Wang, Erin Walker, Rishabh Chaudhry, and Ruth Wylie Artificial Intelligence in Education

Apocalypse Moon: Neal Stephenson on his new novel, Seveneves, and the future of humanity

An interview with Neal Stephenson about his new novel, Seveneves, humanity’s resilience, and more.

Living Tomorrow

Our science fiction visions of the future often obsess over the mechanical and the digital—from rockets and space stations to holodecks and cyberspace. In this volume, 11 young authors use science fiction storytelling to explore a diverse range of possible futures shaped by biological and environmental challenges and solutions.

Maroon Square with a the word slate in the center of the square.

Take a picture. It’ll last longer

An experimental philosopher’s project to document 100 or even 1,000 years of change with a single photograph.
Joey Eschrich
Slate – Future Tense

An Interview With Margaret Atwood

Climate fiction, or “cli fi,” can be a dreary genre. Storytellers like to make a grim business of climate change, populating their narratives with a humorless onslaught of death, destruction, drowned monuments, and starving children. Margaret Atwood is the conspicuous exception, somehow managing to tackle the subject, including these familiar elements, with deadpan wit and an irreverent playfulness, making it both more interesting and believable. The flood is coming, her MaddAddam trilogy promises, but there is hope.

Evoke: Human Trafficking

A short comic book about the challenge of human trafficking, and how we might address this crisis. Created in collaboration with the World Bank’s Evoke project.

Cover of Science and science fiction. An interview with Paul Davies. Statement reads Ed Finn sat down to discuss project Hieroglyph with physicist and cosmologist Paul Davies, director of the Beyond Center for Fundamental Concepts in Science at Arizona State University.

An Illuminated Manuscript About Space Exploration, Science Fiction, and Physics

You just don’t see many illuminated manuscripts these days. There’s a good reason why: They take a long time to make. I learned this recently when I set out to commission a thoroughly modern illuminated manuscript: not a religious text, but an interview with theoretical physicist and cosmologist Paul Davies, a professor at Arizona State University and the author of books like How to Build a Time Machine.

Dark Futures

One person’s utopia is another’s dystopia, but both perspectives have one thing in common—hope for humanity is taken away when all the questions are answered for us. This collection of science fiction stories takes us into dark futures so that we can have a conversation about how to avoid them.

Cover of Emerge 2014 Ethics Report. A blond woman in VR glasses smirking at the camera. Under her face is the title - The Future of Me.

Emerge 2014 Ethics Report

Edited by Joel Garreau and Ed Finn
Emerge 2014 Ethics Report

The ICAP Framework: Linking Cognitive Engagement to Active Learning Outcomes

Michelene T. H. Chi & Ruth Wylie
Educational Psychologist

Maroon Square with a the word slate in the center of the square.

Innovation Starvation, the Next Generation

Humankind has lots of great ideas for the future. We need people to carry them out.
Neal Stephenson
Slate – Future Tense

Maroon Square with a the word slate in the center of the square.

Don’t Diss Dystopias

Sci-fi’s warning tales are as important as its optimistic stories.
Ramez Naam
Slate – Future Tense

The Future – Powered by Fiction

Take a whirlwind tour of tomorrow through the minds of 10 young authors as they paint compelling pictures of what could happen over the next several decades through short science fiction stories. Featuring a foreword by professional futurist Brian David Johnson and an interview with journalist Bryan Walsh.

Maroon Square with a the word slate in the center of the square.

The Dystopian City and Urban Policy

Science fiction has inspired scientists and political activists, but it should be an inspiration for municipal governments too.
Annalee Newitz
Slate – Future Tense

Maroon Square with a the word slate in the center of the square.

Meeting My Protagonist

When I wrote a novel about a Nigerian space program, I didn’t expect it to be so close to the truth.
Deji Bryce Olukotun
Slate – Future Tense

Maroon Square with a the word slate in the center of the square.

Project Hieroglyph Story: “The Day It All Ended”

A short story from Hieroglyph, a new science fiction anthology.
Charlie Jane Anders
Slate-Future Tense

Maroon Square with a the word slate in the center of the square.

Only Science Fiction Can Save Us!

What sci-fi gets wrong about income inequality.
Lee Konstantinou
Slate – Future Tense

Blue logo for Robohub

Project Hieroglyph: Science fiction for better futures

Joey Eschrich
Robohub

Maroon Square with a the word slate in the center of the square.

Forget the Tricorder

Why gadgets aren’t the coolest part of science fiction.
Joey Eschrich
Slate – Future Tense

Maroon Square with a the word slate in the center of the square.

Project Hieroglyph Story: “Covenant”

A short story from Hieroglyph, a new science fiction anthology.
Elizabeth Bear
Slate – Future Tense

The book cover for Hieroglyph: Stories and Visions for a Better Future

Hieroglyph: Stories & Visions for a Better Future

Inspired by New York Times bestselling author Neal Stephenson, an award-winning anthology of stories, set in the near future, from some of today’s leading writers, thinkers, and visionaries that reignites the iconic and optimistic visions of the golden age of science fiction.

Annual Report 2013-14

Our center’s progress for the year 2013-14.

An Aerialist, Two Clowns, and a Robot Walk Into a Carnival …

In his 1984 film The Terminator and its sequels, James Cameron imagines a dystopic future in which armies of intelligent robots move with startling suddenness from positions of servility to utter and violent dominance, destroying civilization and driving humankind to the brink of extinction.

This, of course, is pure science fiction. There’s little reason to believe things will unfold that way. First, they would take all our jobs and wreck our economy.

This is the nightmare narrative of our future with robots and artificial intelligence. The utopian version of this tale—one accepted by many powerful people in industry and government—involves a …read more

Confess Your Digital Sins

A voice cries out in the desert:

“Know thyself, not thy selfies!”

“Digital media will not save you!”

“The zero is not whole and the one is not The One!”

Technically, we’re not in the desert—we’re in a dusty parking lot in downtown Phoenix. And the voice is not coming from the Prophet Isaiah, but from professor Ron Broglio, whom I’ve ordained as a Minister of the Digital Tabernacle. As people wander into the massive circus tent at Arizona State University’s Emerge: Carnival of the Future, they are greeted by a pair of shifty evangelists preaching the analog Word. (Disclosure: …read more

How to Make Music With Drones

The good thing about performing music with drones is that they always show up for rehearsal on time. The bad thing is that they might suddenly drop out of the air and onto your head.

I learned all this while putting together a piece called “Drone Confidential” for Arizona State University’s Emerge, a “Carnival of the Future” that was held in Phoenix recently. Emerge is an annual circus of cool new technologies in performance, dedicated to showing how artists and machines can work together to create something awesome. …read more

A close up photo of a computer screen with unreadable numbers and words stack on each other and all different colors.

What if Computers Know You Better Than You Know Yourself?

I recently read about the launches of both an “ultrasecure” mobile phone for protecting privacy and a clip-on camera that takes a picture of everything you do at 30-second intervals. Our cultural relationship with data is more complicated and contradictory than it has ever been, and our debates on the subject almost always center on privacy. But privacy, the notion that only you should be able to control information about yourself, cloaks a deeper tension between information and meaning, between databases and insights.

The self-explanation principle in multimedia learning.

Ruth Wylie and Michelene T. H. Chi The Cambridge Handbook of Multimedia Learning

A Day in My Life in 2025

A collection of science fiction stories exploring possible futures, written by authors from Brazil. Presented by futurist Brian David Johnson and the Tomorrow Project.

Um dia da minha vida em 2025

As histórias reunidas nesta antologia nos permitem vislumbrar possíveis cenários do nosso futuro, onde a única limitação é a nossa própria imaginação.

Book cover for "The Future of Publishing" Volume 1. Subtitle "The Future of the Book" Contributing authors, Arial Bogle, Joey Eschrich, Jane Friedman, Dan Gillmor, Lee Konstantinou, Charlie Stross, Corey Pressman. Edited by Ed Finn

Sprint Beyond the Book: The Future of Publishing

Frankfurt Book Fair, Frankfurt, Germany

Cautions, Dreams & Curiosities

Science-based visions of the future, created by professional science fiction authors and young people from across the globe, exploring futures we want to work toward and possibilities we work together to avoid. Presented by CSI and the Tomorrow Project.

Annual Report 2012-13

Download the 2012-13 Annual Report

Book Cover, Title: American Dreamers Quote reads "My new American Dream is the hope that my old American dream-the one that I was lucky enough to live myself-will continue to expand and be available to all who seek it." Arianna Huffington. Subtitle, Optimists, Mavericks, and Mad Inventors Share their dreams for brighter futures.

First Principles

Newly released: American Dreamers, a collection of “dreams from optimists, inventors and mavericks with ideas for a brighter future.” My essay (online here) leads off the book with a look at the combustible, illuminating nature of good ideas and the unique optimism of the American Dream. It’s also a pretty good declaration of principles for what we are trying to accomplish at the Center for Science and the Imagination.

Imagining the Future and Building It

We can change the future by changing the story we tell ourselves about the future that we are going to live in. Imagining the Future and Building It features science fiction prototypes written by leading science fiction authors Madeline Ashby and Karl Schroeder, and technologists Roger Kay, Kathleen Maher, Rob Enderle, and Jon Peddie.

Conversations About the Future

Conversations about changing the future with futurist Brian David Johnson, science fiction author Cory Doctorow, media theorist Douglas Rushkoff, and artist/technologist will.i.am.

The Tomorrow Project

Authors and futurists Douglas Rushkoff, Ray Hammond, Scarlett Thomas, and Markus Heitz create tales of the future, inspired by cutting-edge technology research, in this collection presented by Intel’s Tomorrow Project.