Annual Report 2019/20

Publications

Annual Report 2019/20

Annual Report 2019/20 PDF Annual Report 2019/20 EPUB

Neutrality, “New” Digital Divide, and Openness Paradox: Equity in Learning Environments Mediated by Educational Technology

Areej Mawasi, Arizona State University Earl Aguilera, Frenso State University Ruth Wylie, Arizona State University Elisabeth Gee, Arizona State University

Facing the Pariah of Science: The Frankenstein Myth as a Social and Ethical Reference for Scientists

 Peter Nagy,  Ruth Wylie, Joey Eschrich, Ed Finn Science and Engineering Ethics

Approaches to Light

From 5:49 to 6:17 on the morning April 13, 2019, four groups of people quietly contemplated the same astronomical phenomenon. The modest star of a solar system on the outer

Everything Change: An Anthology of Climate Fiction, Volume II

Everything Change, Volume II features 10 stories from our 2018 Everything Change Climate Fiction Contest, along with a foreword by our lead judge, renowned science fiction author Kim Stanley Robinson.

Annual Report 2018/19

Grey rectangles stacked on top of each other

The Enduring Influence of a Dangerous Narrative: How Scientists Can Mitigate the Frankenstein Myth

Bioethical Inquiry
Peter Nagy, Ruth Wylie, Joey Eschrich and Ed Finn

Drawn Futures: Arizona 2045

Drawn Futures: Arizona 2045 is a science-based comic book for 5th through 8th  grade students from Arizona State University’s Center for Science and the Imagination. Created by award-winning comics authors

Annual Report 2017/18

Logo for the Wall Street Journal: the letters “WSJ” in black, all-caps against a textured beige background.

‘Frankenstein’ Has Become a True Monster

Ed Finn and David H. Guston The Wall Street Journal

Space Is Not a Void

By Joey Eschrich and Ed Finn
Future Tense – Slate

Artificial Intelligence Is Around the Corner. Educators Should Take Note

Michael Bennett
Education Week

Cover for Visions, Ventures, Escape Velocities: A collection of space Futures. Edited by Ed Finn and Joey Eschrich. Photo of the inside of a futuristic space station. A ship and planet can be seen outside the window.

Visions, Ventures, Escape Velocities: A Collection of Space Futures

Why should we go to space?  Visions, Ventures, Escape Velocities takes on the challenge of imagining new stories at the intersection of public and private—narratives that use the economic and social history of exploration, as well as current technical and scientific research, to inform scenarios for the future of the “new space” era.

The Rightful Place of Science: Frankenstein

Edited by Megan Halpern, Joey Eschrich, and Jathan Sadowski Two hundred years after its publication, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus continues to speak to modern concerns about science,

An average increase; Eric Kassel's 24 hrs in Photos in which he exhibited 24 hours worth of photos uploaded to Flickr.

Art by Algorithm

Ed Finn
Aeon

Cover for Overview Stories in the Stratosphere

Overview: Stories in the Stratosphere

What kinds of gripping confrontations and adventures might unfold in near space, above the clouds?

Ulises I

Ulises I is an art mission to space by the Colectivo Espacial Mexicano. This is a personal journal, photographic record, and collection of essays documenting the mission, by Juan José Díaz Infante and other collaborators. Note: This is a beta version of the Ulises I book.

Balancing Student Needs and Learning Theory in a Social Interactive Postdigital Textbook

Erin Walker, Ruth Wylie, Andreea Danielescu, James P. Rodriguez III, Ed Finn End-User Considerations in Educational Technology Design, IGI Global

Frankenstein Book Cover Frankenstein written in angular typeface. Written by Mary Shelley. Annotated for Scientists, Engineers, and Creators of all kinds. Edited by David H. Guston, Ed Finn, and Jason Scott Robert

Frankenstein: Annotated for Scientists, Engineers, and Creators of All Kinds

A unique and accessible edition of one of the most thought-provoking and influential novels ever written.

What Algorithms Want

In this book, Ed Finn considers how the algorithm—in practical terms, “a method for solving a problem”—has its roots not only in mathematical logic but also in cybernetics, philosophy, and magical thinking.