Emerge 2019 celebrates invention

Emerge

Since its inception in 2012, Emerge has pushed the envelope of performance, technology, and critical thinking. Each year we explore this intersection by asking challenging questions about the future of our mediated lives by building, sharing, and experimenting with visceral experiences of the future. emerge.asu.edu

Emerge 2019 celebrates invention

Ride an ornithopter, interact with robot marionettes and explore the theme of “Invention!,” celebrating human inventiveness on the occasion of the 500th anniversary of the death of Leonardo da Vinci.

Emerge 2019: Invention!

Emerge is a festival of art, science, and technology devoted to creative imagination and experiences of tomorrow. Ride an ornithopter, interact with robot marionettes and explore the theme of “Invention!,”

Imaginary Worlds: Living in Space

People have fantasized for ages about what it would be like to live in space. If Elon Musk or Jeff Bezos achieve their goals with Space X and Blue Origin,

ASU creates interactive moon colony exhibit

Fox 10 News

Explore a prototype moon colony this weekend at ASU

AZFamily.com

ASU Emerge to create a moon colony on campus

Mary Beth Faller ASU Now

Several people's faces, separate from one another, against a white background, with an image of the Moon looming above.

Emerge: Luna City 2175

Emerge will transform ASU’s Galvin Playhouse into a rich, immersive experience grounded in space-science research and the inspirational vision of our Writer-at-Large, Kim Stanley Robinson. Come see, hear, touch and

VIVORIUM. Ali Schachtschneider, photographed by Hiu Zhi Wei.

Emerge 2017: Frankenstein

EMERGE is an annual transmedia art, science and technology festival designed to engage diverse publics in the creative exploration of our possible futures. The festival’s 2017 theme is Frankenstein, a 200-year old

Jonathon Keats, Thousand Year Photo

A short documentary by Nathan Broderick about experimental philosopher Jonathon Keats, the Millennium Camera, installed at the ASU Art Museum, and the Deep Time Photo Lab, an interactive exhibit that debuted at ASU’s Emerge festival in March 2015.

Emerge 2015 Highlights

In March 2015, Arizona State University’s Emerge presented eleven spellbinding “visitations from the future” – tangible, visceral experiences at the intersection of art and science. Learn more at emerge.asu.edu.

Maroon Square with a the word slate in the center of the square.

Take a picture. It’ll last longer

An experimental philosopher’s project to document 100 or even 1,000 years of change with a single photograph.
Joey Eschrich
Slate – Future Tense

Headshot of Jonathon Keats

A Crazy Experiment Attempts to Document Change With a Photo Taken Over 1,000 Years

A new project by experimental philosopher Jonathon Keats at Arizona State University involves creating simple, incredibly durable pinhole cameras that will slowly create a single image over the course of a century or a millennium.

Headshot of Jonathon Keats

Documenting the next millennium of Tempe urbanization in history’s slowest photograph

Boasting two interstate freeways and one of Arizona’s largest shopping malls, the city of Tempe has been selected to represent the evolution of world civilization over the next thousand years.

Jad Abumrad holding a light bulb

ASU invites community to help redesign the future at Emerge 2015

Radically new visions of the future will be showcased as part of Arizona State University’s Emerge 2015 – a one-day event featuring visionary Jad Abumrad, host of the award-winning show Radiolab, and 10 spellbinding “visitations from the future,” including theatrical performances, improvisation, games, dance and hands-on opportunities to design and build the future.

Cover of Emerge 2014 Ethics Report. A blond woman in VR glasses smirking at the camera. Under her face is the title - The Future of Me.

Emerge 2014 Ethics Report

Edited by Joel Garreau and Ed Finn
Emerge 2014 Ethics Report

5 Burning Questions: David Rothenberg

In this episode, we talk with interspecies jazz musician and philosopher David Rothenberg. David appeared at Arizona State University’s Emerge: Carnival of the Future on March 7, 2014 to perform alongside flying quadcopters and the band There Is Danger. Click here to watch a clip of the performance, titled “Drone Confidential,” and visit Slate’s Future Tense channel to read an article about the process of creating the performance. Check out this transcript of the interview, or watch the video below! https://vimeo.com/91355576

An Aerialist, Two Clowns, and a Robot Walk Into a Carnival …

In his 1984 film The Terminator and its sequels, James Cameron imagines a dystopic future in which armies of intelligent robots move with startling suddenness from positions of servility to utter and violent dominance, destroying civilization and driving humankind to the brink of extinction.

This, of course, is pure science fiction. There’s little reason to believe things will unfold that way. First, they would take all our jobs and wreck our economy.

This is the nightmare narrative of our future with robots and artificial intelligence. The utopian version of this tale—one accepted by many powerful people in industry and government—involves a …read more

Confess Your Digital Sins

A voice cries out in the desert:

“Know thyself, not thy selfies!”

“Digital media will not save you!”

“The zero is not whole and the one is not The One!”

Technically, we’re not in the desert—we’re in a dusty parking lot in downtown Phoenix. And the voice is not coming from the Prophet Isaiah, but from professor Ron Broglio, whom I’ve ordained as a Minister of the Digital Tabernacle. As people wander into the massive circus tent at Arizona State University’s Emerge: Carnival of the Future, they are greeted by a pair of shifty evangelists preaching the analog Word. (Disclosure: …read more

How to Make Music With Drones

The good thing about performing music with drones is that they always show up for rehearsal on time. The bad thing is that they might suddenly drop out of the air and onto your head.

I learned all this while putting together a piece called “Drone Confidential” for Arizona State University’s Emerge, a “Carnival of the Future” that was held in Phoenix recently. Emerge is an annual circus of cool new technologies in performance, dedicated to showing how artists and machines can work together to create something awesome. …read more

Technology, Craft and Spirituality: Building a Gyroscopic Mandala

Our friend Thad Trubakoff, an MFA student in Woodworking at ASU and a contributor to our recent Cautions, Dreams and Curiosities anthology, just let us know about a cool new project, which he calls “Gyroscopic Mandala.” Check out the demo video and read Thad’s guest post about the project below. To learn more about ASU and Mandalas, which have been popping up around here a lot recently, visit our Emerge 2014: The Carnival of the Future website: http://emerge.asu.edu.