ASU writing contest breathes new life into climate-change conversation

climate futures

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ASU writing contest breathes new life into climate-change conversation

Arizona State University unveils climate fiction anthology

Book features authors from six different countries alongside science fiction luminaries Paolo Bacigalupi, Kim Stanley Robinson

Writ in Water: Millimeters to the End of the World

By Joseph Horton, Ploughshares

Building Visions of Humanity’s Climate Future – in Fiction and on Campus

Overlooking an ocean, a fictional piece of land resembling an island appears to be levitating. Long, ropy vines connect the floating island to other pieces of the mainland. On the floating island, we see a small mountain, a forest, and rocky terrain below.

Contest challenges writers to imagine futures shaped by climate change

The Imagination and Climate Futures Initiative at Arizona State University invites writers to submit short stories that explore climate change, science and human futures for its first Climate Fiction Short Story Contest. The submission deadline is Jan. 15, 2016, and contest entry is free. The contest will be judged by science fiction legend Kim Stanley Robinson.

September 17: Paolo Bacigalupi to imagine Southwest water futures at ASU

In Paolo Bacigalupi’s most recent science fiction novel, The Water Knife, Phoenix is dried up and California and Nevada are not too far behind. The millions of people who rely on the Colorado River to survive are not only thirsty, but fighting for their lives. It’s a compelling story that captures a not-so-distant future. Will Phoenix eventually collapse? Will the river dry up?

Margaret Atwood, by Jean Malek

Margaret Atwood, ASU collaborators explore climate futures

What might a world without oil look like? How will human societies cope with massive changes in the Earth’s climate? How will we adapt to survive the future? And how can storytelling and art — alongside science and technology — help us confront the challenge of climate change?

Photo of the grand canyon on a cloudy day

Imagining Climate

Published as part of a series of short stories and essays over at Medium.com’s magazine Matter on climate change, climate fiction, and how to survive the future. Check out the

The cover of the book “The Water Knife,” by Paolo Bacigalupi. The title is shown in a water-like font, dripping down the cover, but the words “The Water Knife” are still clear and legible.

Author Paolo Bacigalupi to imagine Southwest water wars at ASU on Sept. 17

In Paolo Bacigalupi’s most recent science fiction novel, The Water Knife, Phoenix is dried up and California and Nevada are not too far behind. The millions of people who rely

Margaret Atwood on Systems and Solutions

In November 2014, award-winning author Margaret Atwood visited Arizona State University as part of the Imagination and Climate Futures Initiative. In this interview, she discusses topics ranging from climate change and storytelling to the nature of hope and how she conducts scientific research for her books.

Margaret Atwood on Science and Storytelling

In November 2014, award-winning author Margaret Atwood visited Arizona State University as part of the Imagination and Climate Futures Initiative. In this interview, she discusses topics ranging from climate change and storytelling to the nature of hope and how she conducts scientific research for her books.

Margaret Atwood on the Imagination

In November 2014, award-winning author Margaret Atwood visited Arizona State University as part of the Imagination and Climate Futures Initiative. In this interview, she discusses topics ranging from climate change and storytelling to the nature of hope and how she conducts scientific research for her books.

Margaret Atwood on Hope and the “Everything Change”

In November 2014, award-winning author Margaret Atwood visited Arizona State University as part of the Imagination and Climate Futures Initiative. In this interview, she discusses topics ranging from climate change and storytelling to the nature of hope and how she conducts scientific research for her books.

An Interview With Margaret Atwood

Climate fiction, or “cli fi,” can be a dreary genre. Storytellers like to make a grim business of climate change, populating their narratives with a humorless onslaught of death, destruction, drowned monuments, and starving children. Margaret Atwood is the conspicuous exception, somehow managing to tackle the subject, including these familiar elements, with deadpan wit and an irreverent playfulness, making it both more interesting and believable. The flood is coming, her MaddAddam trilogy promises, but there is hope.