Sci Fri Book Club: ‘Frankenstein’

Frankenstein Bicentennial

Arizona State University will serve as the network hub for a global celebration of the bicentennial of the writing and publication of Frankenstein, 2016-2018. The celebration will encompass a wide variety of public programs, physical and digital exhibits, research projects, scientific demonstrations, competitions, festivals, art projects, formal and informal learning opportunities, and publications exploring the novel’s colossal scientific, technological, artistic, cultural and social impacts. Learn more at frankenstein.asu.edu.

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Sci Fri Book Club: ‘Frankenstein’

Science Friday

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‘Frankenstein’ Has Become a True Monster

Ed Finn and David H. Guston The Wall Street Journal

Out of Control

Richard Holmes
The New York Review of Books

The Rightful Place of Science: Frankenstein

Edited by Megan Halpern, Joey Eschrich, and Jathan Sadowski Two hundred years after its publication, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus continues to speak to modern concerns about science,

Flatliners: Unexpected Frankensteins

Get tickets Frankenstein! Beyond green skin and neck bolts, what else comes to mind? Environmental degradation? The technological singularity? Vicious high school cliques? FilmBar and Arizona State University’s Center for

Her: Unexpected Frankensteins

Forget Alexa – here’s an artificial intelligence you can truly fall for. Join us Wednesday, July 19 at FilmBar Phoenix for Spike Jonze’s visionary “Her,” part of our Unexpected Frankensteins

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CSI Conversations: Cory Doctorow

Cory talks about his new novel Walkaway and his essay in the book Frankenstein: Annotated for Scientists, Engineers, and Creators of All Kinds, a new critical edition edited by the leaders of ASU’s Frankenstein Bicentennial Project.

Frankenstein Book Cover Frankenstein written in angular typeface. Written by Mary Shelley. Annotated for Scientists, Engineers, and Creators of all kinds. Edited by David H. Guston, Ed Finn, and Jason Scott Robert

Frankenstein: Annotated for Scientists, Engineers, and Creators of All Kinds

A unique and accessible edition of one of the most thought-provoking and influential novels ever written.

Frankenstein Book Cover Frankenstein written in angular typeface. Written by Mary Shelley. Annotated for Scientists, Engineers, and Creators of all kinds. Edited by David H. Guston, Ed Finn, and Jason Scott Robert

“It’s Alive!” Frankenstein’s Lessons for Scientists and Creators

Get tickets here >> Two hundred years after its creation,  Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus is still alive and well, continuing to shape how we imagine science and its

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Why Frankenstein is a Stigma Among Scientists

Peter Nagy, Ruth Wylie, Joey Eschrich, Ed Finn Science and Engineering Ethics Download article

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Science Fiction TV Dinner: The X-Files

When we think of The X-Files, we think of sprawling government conspiracies, eerie UFO sightings, cigarette-smoking men, and the compelling dynamic between the smoldering, occasionally unhinged Fox Mulder and the doggedly

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How Frankenstein’s Monster Became Sexy

Joey Eschrich
Slate – Future Tense

Unexpected Frankensteins: Weird Science

Buy tickets today! Frankenstein! Beyond green skin and neck bolts, what else comes to mind? Environmental degradation? The technological singularity? Vicious high school cliques? Each month throughout 2017, we’re partnering

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Frankenstein at 200 Exhibit

Exhibit is on display from August 30 through December 10, 2016 No work of literature has done more to shape the way people imagine science and its moral consequences than

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It’s Alive! Frankenstein’s Influence 200 Years Later

By Sarah Ventre, KJZZ 91.5 FM

NSF Transmedia Project

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is a modern myth; a 200-year-old science-fiction story with themes of human creativity, societal responsibility and scientific ethics. Two centuries later, these themes continue to resonate in our technological age.  As

The Frankenstein Bicentennial Dare

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The Dare

Two centuries ago, on a dare to tell the best scary story, 19-year-old Mary Shelley imagined an idea that became the basis for Frankenstein. Mary’s original concept became the novel that arguably kick-started the genres of science fiction and Gothic horror, but also provided an enduring myth that shapes how our society continues to grapple with creativity, science, technology, and their consequences. Two hundred years later, inspired by that classic dare, CSI launched a series of creative challenges inspiring amateur and professional writers to reflect on questions of science, ethics, creativity, and responsibility.

Stitching Together Creativity and Responsibility: Interpreting Frankenstein Across Disciplines

By Megan K. Halpern, Jathan Sadowski, Joey Eschrich, Ed Finn, and David H. Guston Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society

Star Wars Day: May the 4th Be With You

Our communications and public engagement strategist Bob Beard visited Phoenix’s NBC affiliate, 12 News, to discuss Star Wars Day and why science fiction fandom matters. Watch now…